Treasure Cache Found in Scotland with XP DEUS

Scottish Treasure Hunter Gus Patterson

The Big Scottish Coin Hoard found with the XP Deus V3 by Gus Patterson (Ironman)

“Well, where do I start? I have only been detecting for around 10 months and have made some terrific finds in that time with my XP Deus, culminating in a hoard of 322 Edward I medieval silver pennies just before the festive holiday period last year. A very merry Christmas indeed!

The time period the hoard spans is over 70 years and includes coins from various monarchs such as ; Edward I (1272-1307) , Edward II (1307-27), Edward III(1327-77) of England and Ireland; Alexander III (1249-86), John Baliol (1292-1296) of Scotland. Several of the coins are continental sterlings and also various coin errors and even a very rare English /Irish mule* of Edward I.

This has been an incredible few weeks and I still feel as excited now as I did the night I found the first coins, myself and my detecting buddy Derek McLennan, had been out in horrible weather conditions since 9am and by the time 3pm had come, we had hit very little and decided to finish up for the day.

 

Coins from Hoard

Pictured with the XP DEUS are several coins from the recently found Scottish treasure hoard.

It was on the return to our car that we worked our way across a field we had not covered, Derek went left, I went right, I suppose that’s the fine line when it comes to discoveries. A few hundred meters later I got a good signal, checked both ways, I was as sure as I could be that I had some silver but as we all know, buttons and pull rings tend to confuse the issue somewhat, so I started to dig. It was dark now and very wet and muddy, I rooted around in the hole with my probe and found what I was looking for, on close inspection it proved to be two silver pennies stuck together back to back!

I called out to Derek, he took a look and straight away our thoughts turned to a possible hoard, as its unusual to find two stuck together in such a manner, it just looked like perhaps they had been stacked ?

What happened next will be with me forever, wherever I turned the Deus was calling to me ‘dig here, dig here ‘. We then made a very difficult decision; we switched off our machines and left the field.

The coin hoard has already been described by a leading numismatist as “quite extraordinary” and has been reported to Treasure Trove Scotland. Part of the container, which appears to be a leather purse, was also retrieved and has been taken for preservation. The next few days and couple of weeks were unbelievable, the total now stands at 322 coins and I believe there are still more to be found. How I will follow this up I do not know but I most certainly will not be swapping my Deus for anything else anytime soon.”

Editors note: In numismatics, a mule is a coin or medal minted with obverse and reverse designs not normally seen on the same piece. These can be intentional or produced by error. This type of error is highly sought after, and examples can fetch steep prices from collectors.

XP DEUS WS4 Metal Detector finds Early Bronze Age Axe Head

 

Terry Kay bronze age axe head

Terry Kay recently found an Early Bronze-Age axe head found with XP DEUS WS4 detector.

Terry Kay is an involved volunteer. It can be Pike Fishing or running Football Club for the children, it does it seriously with aim. It is the same about detection: when he realized he found a hoard he worked with archaeologist so patrimony can be discovered and preserved at the same time. Here is their story:

“My name is Terry Kay. I live in Inverness, Scotland. 2 years ago, I decided I wanted to try something different to do with the great outdoors and I started metal detecting.

This year I decided that I wanted to upgrade to the XP-DEUS WS4 detector, I couldn’t afford the full DEUS. So being keen to try it out I went to a local field which I had permission. I found it amazing as it DID what it said it would do.

After a couple of weeks whilst detecting around the end of September a few miles from Inverness in a field that myself and fellow detectorist Bill Greig had been keen to get in since we started metal detecting 2 years ago, As every time we got to it, it had be re-ploughed and re-planted before we got a chance to detect on it but this time we were lucky or was it fate?

 

2200-2000 BC axe head

The Axe Head discovered dated from 2200-2000 BC. it is of a relatively unusual type as it was covered in tin during manufacture making it a spectacular shining object.

While detecting on this field with the XP DEUS WS4 by myself this time I received a very strong signal. So I decided to dig were the signal was at its strongest and to my surprise and Delight I uncovered a beautiful Early Bronze Age Flat Axe which was quite near the surface I would estimate it at about 5 inches from the surface. Realising the significance of my discovery I informed Treasure Trove in Edinburgh and I also liaised with local Archaeologist Mr Eric Grant from NOSAS.

I was even more pleased to learn that THE Axe Head I had discovered dated from 2200-2000 BC and that it was of a relatively unusual type as it was covered in tin during manufacture making it a spectacular shining object .Rather than being used for cutting wood etc. This axe was probably ritually deposited in the ground possibly along with other axes or some kind of other metal objects.

I am currently in the process of searching for these with baited breath.

 

Terry and Gary

Terry Kay said “I am so proud that I have discovered something like this and knowing that it will be seen by thousands of people…”

I am so proud that I have discovered something like this and knowing that it will be seen by thousands of people long after I am gone I still get excited when I think about it and whilst showing it to my friends and family I get nervous because I get worried that they will drop it so I don’t let too many people handle it as I have to give it to Treasure Trove this week.”

Dr Eric Grant has been contacted also, about this find he adds:

“Terry has been very helpful in lending me the axe to show to a Bronze Age specialist from the National Museums of Scotland who confirmed that it was an excellent example of a Migdale type flat axe dating to about 2000 BC. When the axe was made the surface was tinned, giving it a splendid shining appearance. It is likely that the axe was a ritual deposit or placed in grave rather than being used for woodworking. Terry also persuaded the Teasure Trove unit to let him keep the axe a bit longer so that I could display it at a lecture on the archaeology of the local area that I had already arranged to give to the North of Scotland Archaeological Society on 21 October 2014.”

Saxon Treasure Found by Paul Coleman with DEUS Metal Detector

Gary Interviews Paul Coleman:

Paul-Coleman with treasure

Paul Coleman pictured with the Saxon treasure he found with his DEUS metal detector.

I had a great day with Paul and really enjoyed his company, as a fellow detectorist we had so many stories to exchange, my initial task was to interview him on his latest find, the Anglo Saxon Hoard.

As many of you know Paul was the finder of over 5000 Saxon hammered coins near a town called Lenborough north of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire.

He said “I still can’t believe it was me it’s like watching a good film”.

Saxon Treasure

This Saxon treasure contained uncirculated coins of Ethelred II and Canute, other coins from the hoard are still to be cleaned and recorded.

Paul is a very humble man and I could tell during our time spent together that he detects purely out of passion and is not motivated by the value of finds.

I asked Paul why he purchased a Deus, he answered because he stumbled on a good site a few years back and his machines at the time just could not cope with the iron in the ground, Iron contamination can be a classic signature of an ancient site.

Paul Coleman on Coin Signals

Paul said “never once did the Deus give me a bad reading, it was a positive signal all the way….”

“The Deus had been on my shopping list for a long while, now I had the site for it there was no excuses. It was not easy raising the funds for the Deus, but I am so glad I got it as my finds rate went up 150% overnight”.

His new site yielded a wealth of great coins and artifacts all amongst heavy iron contamination. Paul went on to say “since owning the Deus some of his old sites have come to life again”.

I wanted to know what programs Paul used when he was new to the Deus and what programs he uses now……The answer was quite a shocker !

“I use Basic 1 all the time with the 11” coil, I even found my hoard with Basic 1”

So you never use any other program?

“No why should I, if it’s not broke don’t fix it”

Anglo-Saxon period coins

The Anglo-Saxon period lasted about 600 years and ended in 1066 with the Norman Conquest.

He then went on to tell me the hoard was a massive signal, initially at least 40cm wide, then he started to dig and soon realized he needed to make the hole wider.

He dug down about 50cm, only then could he pick up the target with his pin point probe. The lead container then started to appear, underneath the folded lead were the uncirculated coins of Ethelred II and Canute, other coins from the hoard are still to be cleaned and recorded.

Paul said “never once did the Deus give me a bad reading, it was a positive signal all the way, I just knew it was something interesting”.

The Archaeological FLO’s (Finds Liaison Officers) were on site and allowed Paul excavate the coins under their supervision they also advised him on how to proceed with his fantastic Anglo Saxon find.

Saxon Coins Unearthed

The treasure is in the Museum. Paul visited the British Museum to see the coins just before this interview.

The term Anglo-Saxon refers to settlers from the German regions of Angeln and Saxony who began attacking Roman Britain in AD410

The Anglo-Saxon period lasted about 600 years and ended in 1066 with the Norman Conquest.

Just before our interview Paul visited the British Museum to see the

Saxon Treasure Bagged

According to Coleman ““Trust your machine, don’t make adjustments just because you can, only make adjustments because you need to, and never give up on a deep target”

coins. For the first time he was allowed to see and handle this incredible find.

I asked Paul what advice he would give to Deus users, he replied “Trust your machine, don’t make adjustments just because you can, only make adjustments because you need to, and never give up on a deep target”

On behalf of everyone at XP we wish Paul all the best for the future, he will be giving us a further report as the UK treasure act progresses and a final valuation is reached.

Treasure Cache Found in Netherlands with DEUS metal detector

Mark van de Meerakker finds Treasure Cache

Mark van de Meerakker located a cache of 89 silver coins, from the years 1600-1670.

“Hello, My name is Mark van de Meerakker. For more than 10 years I have been a metal detector hobbyist. I often go detecting with other hobbyists in the province of Noord-Brabant in the Netherlands. After a lot of discoveries, the 6th September was one of the most special days for me.

Treasure cache found with DEUS

The cache of silver coins was found in the province of Noord-Brabant in the Netherlands.

I had a lot of fun with searching and the sun was shining brightly on my face when I found this treasure cache. I found one silver coin, and not much later I found another one, and then another one! I got the feeling that I was onto something special.

Mark van de Meerakker holding coins from treasure cache

Mark van de Meerakker is shown holding some of the silver coins from his recently found a treasure with his DEUS metal detector.

After a lot of digging, I reached a total of 89 silver coins, originating between 1600-1670. After some research I found out that there was a disaster in the year 1672. The Netherlands were attacked and plundered by other countries.

You can read about this on Wikipedia by searching for “rampjaar 1672”. At this time rich people buried their money.

axe from the Iron Age

On separate hunt with the DEUS, Mark located this axe from the Iron Age. The axe is 2400 years old!

In all the 89 coins that I found there was nothing dating from above 1672, confirming that treasure was buried in this period.

This is a beautiful find with an extraordinary history. I thought it was just my luck, but a few weeks later I found with my Deus an axe from the Iron Age. The axe is 2400 years old!

It is wrought, and the DEUS distinguishes normal iron and wrought iron. This axe is really special because its condition is so good after 2400 years.”

Mark van de Meerakker

XP DEUS Metal Detector Locates Gold Nugget in the United Kingdom

Priscan Archaeological Survey Team (PAST)

Gold Nugget found by Priscan Archaeological Survey Team (PAST) in England on a recent dig.

The Priscan Archaeological Survey Team (PAST) were out on a recent Sunday and recovered this example of a gold nugget in its raw state still embedded in the quartz.

This was found on what is belied to be a Roman camp site, so it could have been dropped by a centurion in the first to second century AD.

raw state nugget found with DEUS metal detector

This raw state nugget was found with DEUS metal detector by the Priscan Archaeological Survey Team.

As far as it is known, no other raw state nuggets has ever been recovered by a detectorist.

All three members of the Priscan Survey Archaeological Survey team now use the XP DEUS detector, and regularly make finds.