Rare Medieval Gold Brooch Found

Early in 2016 I was metal detecting in Kirby Muxloe, where I had been given exclusive rights, when my XP Deus gave a strange jumpy signal. My VDI readings were jumping between 40 and 70. It was wet and cold so I decided to make this one my last signal of the evening. I went down 4-5 inches and noticed a small Gold object in the side of the hole. I remember thinking, Wow how lucky was that, as the spade only missed this item by a few millimeters.

As I carefully picked it from the soil, I could see it was an item of beauty, I shouted to my mate ‘Gold!’ He came running over and we both admired it. Our thoughts were it was Georgian or Victorian as it looked in excellent condition with superb craftmanship. It had script on one side and white enamel with Gold motifs on the reverse. Amazingly the pin was sill intact and also made of Gold. Later that evening my friend contacted me with and confirmed it was treasure as he had checked on my behalf with our local Finds liaison Officer (FLO). He also said he was convinced it was from the Medieval period and it was my legal duty to hand it in within 14 days to the local coroner or FLO. At that point the nerves kicked in, I couldn’t sleep that night. I was extremely excited as this was my first treasure find. I contacted the farmer the following morning to share the good news with him. He was equally excited, he went on to say the family had farmed the land for a hundred years and were not aware of any treasure being found previously. The brooch ended up with the British Museum who confirmed it was made between 1400 and 1490, they were very interested in the French script which translates to ‘Honour and Joy’. The brooch was with the Museum for around ten months before they decided to ‘disclaim’ the brooch and return it to me.

Brooch was made between 1400 and 1490

Brooch Found by Andy was made between 1400-1490

The next step

After discussions with the farmer, who generously said it was my call as to next steps, I decided to put it up for auction. Sotheby’s were extremely interested but I had, in the meantime, spoken to Adam and Lisa who are both keen metal detectorists and who run the artefacts department called Historica for Hansons Auctioneers and Valuers in Derbyshire. Adam and Lisa were very helpful and knowledgeable. They were excited by this find too. They offered extremely favourable terms for the auction and, along with Charles Hanson himself, promised a lot of local, national and international publicity leading up to the auction date.

Here is a little information about my find:

It is a 15th century “Honour and Joy Gold Heart” brooch

It is a 15th century “Honour and Joy Gold Heart” brooch

It is a 15th century “Honour and Joy Gold Heart” brooch. This was a Medieval gift of love born from the bloody war of the roses. This fine piece is inlaid with enamel and engraved with the French inscription “honor et ioie” (Honour and Joy) I discovered it using my XP Deus just outside the moat of Kirby Muxloe Castle.

Viking Gold and Oath Rings Part Two

The Context of Gold

by Kristen Nedergaard Dreiøe

Now the crops had grown too high for us to sweep our DEUS dectectors. We had to close down the search, leaving the corn to be the guardians over what was possibly remaining in the ground. A month later in mid-July 2016 the Viking bracelets were hastily exhibited at the local museum before their final destination at the National Museum.

In just two weeks, the exhibition had received a month’s worth of visitors!

In just two weeks, the exhibition had received a month’s worth of visitors!

In just two weeks, the exhibition had received a month’s worth of visitors, the atmosphere was electric. It was silly season, and the news about the gold bracelets quickly spread around the globe, and for a while distracted us from pursuing the next steps in our journey…. unearthing more evidence of significant Viking presence in the area.

The corn crops were due to be harvested at the end of October, and an extensive excavation of the finds spot was expected to take place a month or so later. There was plenty of months to grow impatient, which left us time to assist the museum and broaden our knowledge. We decided to make identical written agreements with the twelve major landowners surrounding the “gold field” to ensure a good and long-lasting support for our activities and secure future research for the museum.This was truly citizen science in practice. While waiting for the combine harvesters to do their job we swept the surrounding fields with our XP’s. We were now using GPS tracking to improve our detecting efficiency: Marie red tracks, Poul green tracks and me blue tracks. This method made it easy to see missing area’s and review our different detecting styles.

Garmin e-trex examples

I became very annoyed with my Garmin e-trex as it quickly ran the battery down. So I tested it against my smart phone GPS apps, but had to conclude they did not outsmart my Garmin device (if Glonass satellites were activated).

I became very annoyed with my Garmin e-trex as it quickly ran the battery down. So I tested it against my smart phone GPS apps, but had to conclude they did not outsmart my Garmin device (if Glonass satellites were activated). I also tried out different XP DEUS programs, especially Gary Blackwell’s Hot Program and this later proved itself as a good choice. We covered a lot of non-productive ground over the following months. It was only when we got close to the goldfield we started to discover Viking silver and bronze. These items appeared to be fragments of coins and buckles. We thought we had narrowed down the picture pretty well, until one day Marie found a gold nugget (remains from a goldsmith’s work), this was found nearly one kilometre away. That was mind-blowing. Had she found the workshop where the goldsmith was making the Viking kings jewellery? Suddenly, our original thoughts that the gold bracelets may have been royal gifts to a loyal Viking jarl was now challenged by an even wilder idea, maybe the bracelets were actually produced here. Maybe the find spot was far more important than we had originally thought?

While these thoughts were puzzling us, we were disturbed by a sweet sound. Finally, the heavy machinery started rolling into the field …At last it was harvest time! Based on the location of our finds the museum marked an area of approx. 40×20 metres as a no-go zone, this was going to be the excavation site when the archaeologists were ready to move in (around December). But we were still permitted to search the fields around the site. Our spirits were high but the finds were low during the first few days. Then on the 30th of October I was

Marie posing for the camera with her gold nugget!

Marie posing for the camera with her gold nugget!

using Gary’s HOT program when I made an amazing discovery just outside the excavation zone. I was detecting alone, as I started to unearth a target I noticed a glint of Yellow…. suddenly a gold object emerged from the ground, only this time it was a small piece, but breathtakingly beautifully crafted. It was a Thor’s hammer, it was the missing pendant. (See article 1) . This would now link the gold finds to Viking King Gorm the Old and with him to the first half of the 9th century. He was the last king still faithful to the Norse gods. I was paralysed with dis belief. I had to switch off my machine and return home to share this find with my team.

We had endless dreams about finding the missing pendant, and this is what we hoped to find when we started our quest in spring 2016.

We had endless dreams about finding the missing pendant, and this is what we hoped to find when we started our quest in spring 2016.

We had endless dreams about finding the missing pendant, and this is what we hoped to find when we started our quest in spring 2016. Now it was laying in my hand. Not only had it lead us to the 6 Viking gold bracelets, it also confirmed the location of the excavation site was very significant. We were convinced more treasure was going to emerge from the ground when the shovels would be replaced by serious hydraulic excavators. However, we now had to wait another 5 weeks.

Viking Gold and Oath Rings Part One

It was the first day of summer 2016. The early morning Wednesday sun was throwing its golden rays on the little town of Gram in the South of Jutland (Denmark). In most ways, it was just a normal day, and yet something felt very different. The day before my teammate Poul Nørgaard Pedersen had a spectacular dream. In the horizon he saw a beautiful Viking ship with wind filled sails. As he approached the ship it gradually got smaller until in the end he could put it in his pockets. Marie Aagaard Larsen, my beloved wife and the last member of our three person team called Team Rainbow Power, urged him to share his vision with “our archaeologist” Lars Grundvad from the Museum of Sønderskov Castle.

Lars Grundvad is our contact at the local museum we work very closely together and he takes great pleasure receiving artefacts from our metal detecting expeditions. We are great fans of Lars, because here in Denmark he is one of the new generation of archaeologists, he really appreciates the potential of “citizen science”, the collaboration between the communities of researchers and competent amateurs. His enthusiasm, generous sharing of knowledge and the latest archaeological methods is a great inspiration for us.

Lars was stunned when he heard about Poul’s dream, it was like listening to the tales of Norse Mythology. Skíðblaðnir was mentioned in the Poetic Eddas, according to which it received fair wind whenever its sail was set and it could be folded to a very small cloth and placed in one’s pocket at will. It was an ingenious creation and taken to the finest ship’s in the world of the Nordic Goods.

There was a particular atmosphere when Marie and Poul armed with their XP Deus as they headed for the “gold field” leaving me behind. It was my turn to babysit that Wednesday afternoon. It was warm and the air tense with expectation. In 1911 a farmer found an amazing Viking gold necklace hanging down from one of the tines of his harrow as he was placing the harrow on the wall after a good day’s work in the field. The necklace was fitted with two dragon heads later to be associated with the first Viking Kings of Denmark and their particular style of jewellery “Jellinge style”.

The necklace was fitted with two dragon heads later to be associated with the first Viking Kings of Denmark and their particular style of jewellery “Jellinge style”.

The necklace was fitted with two dragon heads later to be associated with the first Viking Kings of Denmark and their particular style of jewellery “Jellinge style”.

Lars had told us that the necklace was obviously missing a pendant – for instance the hammer of Thor or a crucifix. Our dream was to find this pendant. Little did we know that the name we gave our team would be significant to finding the treasure…..At the end of the rainbow was about to come true. Actually. At first Poul and I were a little uncomfortable with the name that Marie boldly suggested, because of its alternative connotations to the gay community. But, Marie needed to visualise what she was aiming for, and at the end we accepted it… Now we don’t mind it at all.

Finding the pendant would help to exactly determine the age of the necklace. If it was Thor’s hammer, then the necklace could be associated with the Danish Viking king “Gorm the Old”. If it was a crucifix it was to be associated with his son “Harald Bluetooth”, who claimed to be the one who united and baptised the Danes, and as such being the first King ruling the Kingdom of Denmark from year 958 and the following 30 years.

On previous visits we had made a couple of interesting finds from the pre-Viking era (bronze pearls), a Viking coin and a couple of bronze buckles with typical Viking ornamentations. As time passed the finds started drying out, so we decided to move area and focus to the far end of the vast field and continue out further searches there. Why did we decide to move ? we have no idea, however there was a strange feeling when we arrived at the new area, we all felt different and noticed the tense atmosphere.

4:35 PM the 1st of June 2016 Lars Grundvad received a text message from Marie Aagaard Larsen:

Marie: “You must come, NOW – with “Gold Beer”. I’m shaking, I’m shaking”

Lars: “Errhh… alright… could you send me some photos”

Photo of first Viking Gold Bracelet:

Lars: “Holy *** – Are you kidding me?”

Marie: “No – The purest gold”

Lars: “Ohhh ****! I can’t come out now. I’m alone with my baby boy. Could we meet tomorrow? You did it! You’ve made my dream come true. Congratulations to everybody. Congratulations to all of you”

20 minutes later another two gold bracelets emerged from the ground – one of them with the signature design of the Viking kings from Jelling.

20 minutes later another two gold bracelets emerged from the ground – one of them with the signature design of the Viking kings from Jelling.

20 minutes later another two gold bracelets emerged from the ground – one of them with the signature design of the Viking kings from Jelling.

My team members with their XP’s had located a gold treasure with direct links to the first Viking kings in Denmark, and the birth of Denmark as a nation.

Apart from being a strong lager the word “Gold Beer” was a reward Lars boldly offered to his pack of detectorists. It was to be awarded to he or she who found the first archaeological artefact made of gold. In the end, he had to withdraw his offer. As far Too much beer would be at his expense.

My team members with their XP’s had located a gold treasure with direct links to the first Viking kings in Denmark, and the birth of Denmark as a nation.

My team members with their XP’s had located a gold treasure with direct links to the first Viking kings in Denmark, and the birth of Denmark as a nation.

I was also babysitting that afternoon, and I can’t explain to you the mixed emotions flushing through my body as the messages, pictures and calls were constantly disturbing my efforts to be an attentive father to his young son. I was so desperate to join my team. When Marie returned that evening she was in a state of shock, I guess only those who have found extraordinary treasures will know what that feeling is like. And luckily for me and for the team we all found gold bracelets over the following 12 days. We all got to feel the tremendous impact it has on you when you pick up gold from the ground. Like a lightening bolt rushing through your mind and body.

We made an oath to each other that day, that we would equally share whatever came our way, good or bad, rewards or rumors….. In this way we freed ourselves of the worries about who was going out to search the gold field, we were a united team. We found seven rings, six made of gold and one of silver. Probably oath rings offered by the Viking king to one of his very closest allies. We did not give oath rings to each other, but we were fortunate to be able to pass them on to you all.

Poul Nørgaard Pedersen, Marie Aagaard Larsen , Kristen Nedergaard Dreiøe

Poul Nørgaard Pedersen, Marie Aagaard Larsen , Kristen Nedergaard Dreiøe

Story By: Kristen Nedergaard Dreiøe March 2017

Pictures by : Michael Kirkeby Pedersen, Nick Schaadt, Kristen Nedergaard Dreioe and Poul Norgaard

Reading UK DEUS User Dan Stevenson finds Roman Silver Coins!

Congratulations to Dan Stevenson from Reading UK who found a nice hoard of Silver Roman Denarius, using his XP Deus.

He said in an interview ” The signal was not perfect but I just had a good feeling about it” I dug down around 10” and recovered some pieces of lead, then checked the hole and heard another signal.

Roman Silver Coins found by XP DEUS User Dan Stevenson of Reading UK.

Roman Silver Coins found by XP DEUS User Dan Stevenson of Reading UK.

As he pulled another scoop of earth out he could see the Silver coins in the spoil. The signal may have been suspicious because the nails were present in the hole and the coins were orientated in different directions, Dan also noticed signs of burning around the area.

So there are 2 valuable lessons, always re check your hole after digging and investigate suspect signals if they sound deep. The dig near Wells in Somerset UK, was organised by Sean and Nick who own the Southern Detectorist club (picture shown with Dan).

Once the find was discovered the Local FLO’s and Archaeologists were invited to attend, they allowed Dan to excavate his find under their supervision. Dan was also allowed to take his finds home, they will be recorded within 14 days with his local FLO.

The Southern Detectorist team dealt with this fantastic find in a very professional manner, they acted strictly according to the UK treasure act rules and it was a text book hoard recovery, all captured on film. These guys are a real credit to the hobby. Well done to everyone involved and thanks for inviting XP along to share the day.

Archaeological Team and Detectorists Find Historic Roman Site in Hertfordshire, England

Keen Deus users Phil Kirk and Harvey Cross were out detecting one day in January 2013 when Harvey found a handle to a Roman jug and a top of a pot.

Phil Kirk with his XP DEUS metal detector in England.

Phil Kirk with his XP DEUS metal detector in England.

They searched the same area over several outings but nothing else was found except for a few poor quality Roman coins. Then one day in October 2014 Phil decided to go out detecting for a couple of hours while his wife was out shopping, he decided to go back to the original finds spot and try his luck again. He suddenly got a signal reading 97 on the Deus meter, he thought this could be iron, but the numbers were not bouncing the constant  97 made him curious so he dug… He went about 10” down to see the top of a round vessel, at first he thought it was a part of a tractor or farm machinery.

Finds uncovered in Hertfordshire, England recovery.

Finds uncovered in Hertfordshire, England recovery.

Recoveries included metal artifacts, remains of Roman shoes, coins, glass mosaic dishes, hexagonal bottles, a Patera thought to be used for pouring wine or blood.

Recoveries included metal artifacts, remains of Roman shoes, coins, glass mosaic dishes, hexagonal bottles, a Patera thought to be used for pouring wine or blood.

Holding some of the exciting discoveries in hand.

Holding some of the exciting discoveries in hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He then noticed there was more to it and could see the body of a vessel. Phil called his friend Harvey to ask for advice as he works for the local museum…The advice given was “be careful”.

Reviewing some of the exciting finds from the site.

Reviewing some of the exciting finds from the site.

The vessel was unearthed along with some other artifacts, the hole was carefully  filled in and the local archaeologists were informed. As a responsible detectorist Phil wanted to get professional help as he knew any further disturbance could possibly ruin the stratification of the site.

On the second dig with the archaeological team some fantastic finds were unearthed including metal artifacts, remains of Roman shoes, coins, glass mosaic dishes, hexagonal bottles, a Patera thought to be used for pouring wine or blood.

The glass mosaic dishes are a true work of art and believed to have been imported from Egypt.

Some of the craftsmanship used on the metal work was unbelievable, you can see a Roman soldier working, it looks very much like a world war 1 soldier.

The finds all appeared to be located in a large flint cairn very similar to the one in the left picture which confirmed this site was very high status indeed. On the right you can see some of the flints that had been removed. The site was dated to around 200 AD. All the artifacts are now with the museum and awaiting restoration and further tests.

Amazing Finds In Croatia With DEUS Detectors

Croatia-Celtic-silver-Flugelfibel-broochLast April, Adam Staples, his partner Lisa and son Thomas, all XP Deus users, were part of a group of 29 detectorists invited to attend the first Croatian Detecting Rally, organized by the archaeologist from the municipal Museum of Vinkovci and Steve Gaunt. In 316 AD the armies of Constantine I and Licinius fought the Battle of Cibalae on the outskirts of Vinkovci.

The aim of this visit was to try and locate the battle site’s exact location by metal detecting, and also, to identify new archaeological sites as we searched.

croatia-spearhead-vinkovci-museum-background

At this occasion the Ministry of Culture had granted them a special license. The search area was vast, covering thousands of acres of farmland and steeped in history going back over 6000 years.

croatia-bronze-age-axehead

Every day, archaeologists from the museum (Hrvoje Vulić, Boris Kratofil and Robi Balaš) provided them with large-scale maps and instructions on where to search. All finds were to be placed in bags and marked with both location and finder.

croatia-iron-age-artefacts-from-day-2

During the six days of detecting they recovered hundreds of interesting coins and artefacts from the Iron age, Roman and medieval periods… bronze and silver coins, brooches and even a tiny (10mm x 4mm) piece of worked gold. 

croatia-mny-best-day

 The most exciting day was day 5. They spent the morning recovering a scattered hoard of medieval hammered silver coins and then, after a couple of hours digging these coins, they headed off in search of a new adventure.

croatia-silver-denarius-of-domitian-81-96-AD

In a small, waterlogged area of a field we made some amazing discoveries. The finds included a rare Celtic silver brooch and a perfect Bronze age socketed axe head.

croatia-banavac-of-bella-IV

They also found some beautifully preserved Roman coins.

croatia-septimius-severus-denarius

Bronze Age AxeheadDay 3 artefacts, 100 BC – 800 ADIron spearhead with Vinkovci Museum in the background. These finds were probably ritual offerings at a sacred shrine and the site is now likely to be protected by law.

croatia-day-3-artifacts-100-BC-800-AD

All the items recovered were handed over to Vinkovci Museum, who is planning a special exhibition of the group’s finds later this year. They all had a great time working with the archaeologists and the rally was such a success that more are planned for the future.

croatia-P1080023

Note : The Battle of Cibalae was fought on October 8, 314 (or perhaps as late as 316, the chronology is uncertain),[3] between the two Roman emperors Constantine I and Licinius. The opposing armies met on the plain between the rivers Save and Drave near the town of Cibalae (now Vinkovci, Croatia) The site of the battle was approximately 350 kilometers within the territory of Licinius. Constantine won a resounding victory, despite being outnumbered.).

Visiting the Jersey Hoard Through the Eyes of a Metal Detectorist!

The Jersey hoard bought to you by XP Metal Detectors

The Jersey hoard is now at the La Hougue Bie museum where it is being dis assembled and recorded. It’s name is Le Catillon II as Catillon 1 was discovered in 1957… On the same field! I have heard people talk about the museum, however had no idea of its attention to detail until I visited in person, naturally the Jersey hoard is the center of attention but it is surrounded by magnificent finds dating back to neolithic times.

As a metal detectorist I felt proud to be a member of the detecting fraternity, because most of the finds on display were all down to us guys….Well Reg and his club, if it wasn’t for their dedication and the willingness to work with the Jersey Heritage massive parts of history would be lost forever.

And laid out in front of me for the world to see was solid proof that us guys really do a great job and are not “Treasure Hunters” like the media would like to call us, but another branch of Archaeologists who choose to use metal detectors to save history.

La Hougue Bie

La Hougue Bie is a historic site, combined with a with a museum, it’s located in the parish of Grouville.

Hougue is a Norman word meaning mound, and comes from the Old Norse word haugr. The word Bie has an uncertain origin.

Hougue is a Norman word meaning mound, and comes from the Old Norse word haugr. The word Bie has an uncertain origin.

Underneath the earth mound is an 18.6 metre long passage to what’s though is a burial chamber which was in use around 3500 BC. During recent years Archaeologists have removed the soil from one face of the mound to see if the construction is all earth, they were amazed when they uncovered a perfect stone structure beneath the earth, with clear details of skilled stone masonry.

On the top the mound are two medieval chapels, one 12th Century and the other from the 16th Century, the public can still visit the chapels and the chamber.

On the top the mound are two medieval chapels, one 12th Century and the other from the 16th Century, the public can still visit the chapels and the chamber.

During World War II it was used as a key lookout point, and an underground command bunker was built in the mound and adjacent to the chamber. On a day with good light you can still see the medieval paintings on the ceiling.

Weddings are still held in the chapel. The museum hosts a vast array of finds dating back to the stone age. Several coin and artefact hoards are on display in a well-lit environment. The Jersey Hoard Le Catillon II is on full display behind a screen. Visitors can clearly see the hoard being dis assembled and the staff including Reg and Richard are more than happy to stop work and answer any questions.

Some hoard on display date back to the stone age.

Some hoard on display date back to the stone age.

There are several other hoards on display at the museum.

There are several other hoards on display at the museum.

The Jersey hoard so far June 2016

The museum purchased a laser scanner with metrology arm and can measure within 50 microns, that’s a 20th of a millimeter. The coin cleaning process consists of a mild acid soak and then gentle picking with a thorn as this will not damage the coins surface.

On a good day they can clean and record 200 coins.

On a good day they can clean and record 200 coins.

Reg and Richard have undertaken extensive training and now work at the museum cleaning and recording, they are now experts on Jersey coins and indeed historic Jersey. Here is a before and after.

So far the total amount of coins cleaned and recorded has reached 45000, mostly Silver but some Gold.

So far the total amount of coins cleaned and recorded has reached 45000, mostly Silver but some Gold.

In March 2015 coin number 12001 was recorded, making Catillon II the biggest Iron age coin hoard in western Europe beating the Marquanderie hoard which was also found in Jersey 1935 consisting of 12000 coins.

Items cleaned and recorded so far:

So far the total amount of coins cleaned and recorded has reached 45000, mostly Silver but some Gold.

Gold and precious pieces from the Jersey Hoard have been documented and preserved for future generations to enjoy.

Gold and precious pieces from the Jersey Hoard have been documented and preserved for future generations to enjoy.

  • Complete Gold Torcs 5
  • Pieces of Gold Torc 4
  • Gold Bracelets 3
  • Gold Rings 2
  • Gold sheet 2
  • Copper loops 2
  • Stones 1
  • Ingots 7
  • Silver wire 1
  • Decorative Gold pieces 3
  • Glass bead 1
  • Misc objects 6

During my visit a bronze age spear head had started to appear amongst the coins.

Coin types

Some Jersey coins were the XN series Silver based stators which were originally linked to the Abrincatui tribe from the Avranches region in Normandy, they are rare coins, many locals know them as “The Moon Stater” The hoard consisted of mainly coriosolitae staters and are common to Jersey.

The hoard consisted of mainly coriosolitae staters and are common to Jersey.

The hoard consisted of mainly coriosolitae staters and are common to Jersey.

Preservation

The hoard lives under a water vapor screen to mimic real underground conditions and preserve the coins and artifacts until they are ready to be removed.

The uncleaned items from the Jersey hoard live under a water vapor screen awaiting preservation.

The uncleaned items from the Jersey hoard live under a water vapor screen awaiting preservation.

The Replica

Neil Mahrer head conservator for the museum made a fantastic replica of Catillon II, all the coins are hand painted and look exactly like the real thing. It can be seen in the museum proudly on display in front of the real hoard.

Neil Mahrer, head conservator for the museum, made a fantastic replica of Catillon II for display.

Neil Mahrer, head conservator for the museum, made a fantastic replica of Catillon II for display.

View of the Jersey hoard replica on display.

View of the Jersey hoard replica on display.

 

Fact

Avranches is now twinned with St. Helier in Jersey. There is now a book available called Le Catillon II.

Signed copy of Catillon II by Reg Mead and Richard Miles.

Signed copy of Catillon II by Reg Mead and Richard Miles.

I have a signed copy of Catillon II by Reg Mead and Richard Miles, it’s free…All you need to do is register here at the The XP world-wide Forum and post yes please or a comment about this article under the Catillon II competition section.

Visiting La Hougue Bie
A visit to the La Hougue Bie in Jersey is a must for every detectorist the finds on display are truly amazing viewing the hoard in it’s natural form is a once in a lifetime opportunity, once it has been dis assembled and recorded it is possible we will never see it like this again.

*Important Note:
Please DO NOT take your detectors to the island unless you have special permission, customs and detecting laws are very strict.

We recommend staying at the Grand Jersey hotel.

Please drop into the XP forum and say Hi. Visit the XP world-wide Forum here.

If you have any nice XP finds, tips or XP detecting events we would love to incorporate them into our XP Social Media sections so please keep us posted.

Deus Hot Program Locates Nick Reynolds a Gold Hammered Coin

nick-reynolds-image

This beautiful gold hammered was located with the XP DEUS metal detector.

44 years old Nick Reynolds was at a metal detective’s organised dig when he got a perfect signal, he dug down into the soft ploughed soil to see a Gold coin looking back at him.

The coin was instantly recorded with the on-site FLO (Finds Liaison Officer) and identified as an Edward III Half Noble.

nick-reynolds-deus

A proud Nick Reynolds with his DEUS metal detector holding this exciting find.

When I interviewed Nick just after he found the coin he told me how he started detecting in 1994, but after a shoulder operation he needed a lighter machine so he chose an XP Gold Maxx Power and some years later he upgraded to the Deus.

nick-reynolds-gold coin

A nice close up of the Gold Hammered coin found by DEUS detectorist Nick Reynolds on his dig.

 

Nick went on to say, since using the Deus with the 9” coil his finds rate is constantly very high…. especially using the “HOT” program.

Some of his best finds have come from investigating suspicious signals.

XP DEUS Locates 13 Gram Gold Nugget in Africa!

XP DEUS user locates an impressive 13 Gram gold nugget in Africa using the XP DEUS GoldField program 10. The actual recovery of this impressive find is shown in the video below.

The XP DEUS GoldField program was developed and perfected in the African gold fields. Complete details on the GoldField program 10 are shown at this link. The GoldField program is a turn-on-and-go preset mode that is simple to use.

Related Stories:

Half Gram Nugget at 6 Inches Deep!

Deus Finds Nice Nugget

My Beach Nugget

 

Gold Ingots Found with XP DEUS!

By Henry Parro

After finding one of the oldest gold coins in the Essex – Colchester region
of England last year, I wasn’t sure what to expect this year. As you can
see in the accompanying photos, I wasn’t let down. I was hunting in a
corner of a field where several years ago a piece of gold slag was found. I
hit an area that was full of iron and melted slag of various materials,
both ferrous and non-ferrous.

Henry Parro holding one of his recently found gold ingots.

Henry Parro holding one of his recently found gold ingots.

The XP sounded more like a popcorn machine rather than a detector. I worked the area slow and every now and then I would hear a non-ferrous tone. Digging down, I noticed that the soil was dark and consisted of ash indicating a fire at one point. The targets would be melted globs of metal. Due to the heavy iron content it was hard to dig just non-ferrous targets. I received one tone that was different from the rest. As I pulled the target out of the ground, I noticed the gold color. I washed it off to see it was a gold ingot!

I worked the area further until lunch, then we moved to another field. Later that evening back at the barn, several theories developed about the gold ingot. It was a mixture of gold and silver and melted hundreds of years ago. It was possible from a smelter or maker of coins and jewelry. The following day I headed back to the same area. I was joined by my hunting partner CT Todd. I turned reactivity up and iron volume down and it made a difference. By lunch we had found 3 more gold ingots.

While metal detecting with his DEUS, Henry Parro located these amazing gold ingots.

While metal detecting with his DEUS, Henry Parro and CT Todd located these amazing gold ingots.

This shows the versatility of the XP. Several other hunters were in the area with other brands and ventured toward the iron field but quickly gave up and walked away. Needless to say, I will be going back and there will be only one machine in my suitcase, the XP DEUS.

Editors note: Henry Parro owns Parros Gun Shop in Waterbury, VT. He uses the XP DEUS and is an authorized XP dealer.