Reading UK DEUS User Dan Stevenson finds Roman Silver Coins!

Congratulations to Dan Stevenson from Reading UK who found a nice hoard of Silver Roman Denarius, using his XP Deus.

He said in an interview ” The signal was not perfect but I just had a good feeling about it” I dug down around 10” and recovered some pieces of lead, then checked the hole and heard another signal.

Roman Silver Coins found by XP DEUS User Dan Stevenson of Reading UK.

Roman Silver Coins found by XP DEUS User Dan Stevenson of Reading UK.

As he pulled another scoop of earth out he could see the Silver coins in the spoil. The signal may have been suspicious because the nails were present in the hole and the coins were orientated in different directions, Dan also noticed signs of burning around the area.

So there are 2 valuable lessons, always re check your hole after digging and investigate suspect signals if they sound deep. The dig near Wells in Somerset UK, was organised by Sean and Nick who own the Southern Detectorist club (picture shown with Dan).

Once the find was discovered the Local FLO’s and Archaeologists were invited to attend, they allowed Dan to excavate his find under their supervision. Dan was also allowed to take his finds home, they will be recorded within 14 days with his local FLO.

The Southern Detectorist team dealt with this fantastic find in a very professional manner, they acted strictly according to the UK treasure act rules and it was a text book hoard recovery, all captured on film. These guys are a real credit to the hobby. Well done to everyone involved and thanks for inviting XP along to share the day.

Archaeological Team and Detectorists Find Historic Roman Site in Hertfordshire, England

Keen Deus users Phil Kirk and Harvey Cross were out detecting one day in January 2013 when Harvey found a handle to a Roman jug and a top of a pot.

Phil Kirk with his XP DEUS metal detector in England.

Phil Kirk with his XP DEUS metal detector in England.

They searched the same area over several outings but nothing else was found except for a few poor quality Roman coins. Then one day in October 2014 Phil decided to go out detecting for a couple of hours while his wife was out shopping, he decided to go back to the original finds spot and try his luck again. He suddenly got a signal reading 97 on the Deus meter, he thought this could be iron, but the numbers were not bouncing the constant  97 made him curious so he dug… He went about 10” down to see the top of a round vessel, at first he thought it was a part of a tractor or farm machinery.

Finds uncovered in Hertfordshire, England recovery.

Finds uncovered in Hertfordshire, England recovery.

Recoveries included metal artifacts, remains of Roman shoes, coins, glass mosaic dishes, hexagonal bottles, a Patera thought to be used for pouring wine or blood.

Recoveries included metal artifacts, remains of Roman shoes, coins, glass mosaic dishes, hexagonal bottles, a Patera thought to be used for pouring wine or blood.

Holding some of the exciting discoveries in hand.

Holding some of the exciting discoveries in hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He then noticed there was more to it and could see the body of a vessel. Phil called his friend Harvey to ask for advice as he works for the local museum…The advice given was “be careful”.

Reviewing some of the exciting finds from the site.

Reviewing some of the exciting finds from the site.

The vessel was unearthed along with some other artifacts, the hole was carefully  filled in and the local archaeologists were informed. As a responsible detectorist Phil wanted to get professional help as he knew any further disturbance could possibly ruin the stratification of the site.

On the second dig with the archaeological team some fantastic finds were unearthed including metal artifacts, remains of Roman shoes, coins, glass mosaic dishes, hexagonal bottles, a Patera thought to be used for pouring wine or blood.

The glass mosaic dishes are a true work of art and believed to have been imported from Egypt.

Some of the craftsmanship used on the metal work was unbelievable, you can see a Roman soldier working, it looks very much like a world war 1 soldier.

The finds all appeared to be located in a large flint cairn very similar to the one in the left picture which confirmed this site was very high status indeed. On the right you can see some of the flints that had been removed. The site was dated to around 200 AD. All the artifacts are now with the museum and awaiting restoration and further tests.

Amazing Finds In Croatia With DEUS Detectors

Croatia-Celtic-silver-Flugelfibel-broochLast April, Adam Staples, his partner Lisa and son Thomas, all XP Deus users, were part of a group of 29 detectorists invited to attend the first Croatian Detecting Rally, organized by the archaeologist from the municipal Museum of Vinkovci and Steve Gaunt. In 316 AD the armies of Constantine I and Licinius fought the Battle of Cibalae on the outskirts of Vinkovci.

The aim of this visit was to try and locate the battle site’s exact location by metal detecting, and also, to identify new archaeological sites as we searched.

croatia-spearhead-vinkovci-museum-background

At this occasion the Ministry of Culture had granted them a special license. The search area was vast, covering thousands of acres of farmland and steeped in history going back over 6000 years.

croatia-bronze-age-axehead

Every day, archaeologists from the museum (Hrvoje Vulić, Boris Kratofil and Robi Balaš) provided them with large-scale maps and instructions on where to search. All finds were to be placed in bags and marked with both location and finder.

croatia-iron-age-artefacts-from-day-2

During the six days of detecting they recovered hundreds of interesting coins and artefacts from the Iron age, Roman and medieval periods… bronze and silver coins, brooches and even a tiny (10mm x 4mm) piece of worked gold. 

croatia-mny-best-day

 The most exciting day was day 5. They spent the morning recovering a scattered hoard of medieval hammered silver coins and then, after a couple of hours digging these coins, they headed off in search of a new adventure.

croatia-silver-denarius-of-domitian-81-96-AD

In a small, waterlogged area of a field we made some amazing discoveries. The finds included a rare Celtic silver brooch and a perfect Bronze age socketed axe head.

croatia-banavac-of-bella-IV

They also found some beautifully preserved Roman coins.

croatia-septimius-severus-denarius

Bronze Age AxeheadDay 3 artefacts, 100 BC – 800 ADIron spearhead with Vinkovci Museum in the background. These finds were probably ritual offerings at a sacred shrine and the site is now likely to be protected by law.

croatia-day-3-artifacts-100-BC-800-AD

All the items recovered were handed over to Vinkovci Museum, who is planning a special exhibition of the group’s finds later this year. They all had a great time working with the archaeologists and the rally was such a success that more are planned for the future.

croatia-P1080023

Note : The Battle of Cibalae was fought on October 8, 314 (or perhaps as late as 316, the chronology is uncertain),[3] between the two Roman emperors Constantine I and Licinius. The opposing armies met on the plain between the rivers Save and Drave near the town of Cibalae (now Vinkovci, Croatia) The site of the battle was approximately 350 kilometers within the territory of Licinius. Constantine won a resounding victory, despite being outnumbered.).

Visiting the Jersey Hoard Through the Eyes of a Metal Detectorist!

The Jersey hoard bought to you by XP Metal Detectors

The Jersey hoard is now at the La Hougue Bie museum where it is being dis assembled and recorded. It’s name is Le Catillon II as Catillon 1 was discovered in 1957… On the same field! I have heard people talk about the museum, however had no idea of its attention to detail until I visited in person, naturally the Jersey hoard is the center of attention but it is surrounded by magnificent finds dating back to neolithic times.

As a metal detectorist I felt proud to be a member of the detecting fraternity, because most of the finds on display were all down to us guys….Well Reg and his club, if it wasn’t for their dedication and the willingness to work with the Jersey Heritage massive parts of history would be lost forever.

And laid out in front of me for the world to see was solid proof that us guys really do a great job and are not “Treasure Hunters” like the media would like to call us, but another branch of Archaeologists who choose to use metal detectors to save history.

La Hougue Bie

La Hougue Bie is a historic site, combined with a with a museum, it’s located in the parish of Grouville.

Hougue is a Norman word meaning mound, and comes from the Old Norse word haugr. The word Bie has an uncertain origin.

Hougue is a Norman word meaning mound, and comes from the Old Norse word haugr. The word Bie has an uncertain origin.

Underneath the earth mound is an 18.6 metre long passage to what’s though is a burial chamber which was in use around 3500 BC. During recent years Archaeologists have removed the soil from one face of the mound to see if the construction is all earth, they were amazed when they uncovered a perfect stone structure beneath the earth, with clear details of skilled stone masonry.

On the top the mound are two medieval chapels, one 12th Century and the other from the 16th Century, the public can still visit the chapels and the chamber.

On the top the mound are two medieval chapels, one 12th Century and the other from the 16th Century, the public can still visit the chapels and the chamber.

During World War II it was used as a key lookout point, and an underground command bunker was built in the mound and adjacent to the chamber. On a day with good light you can still see the medieval paintings on the ceiling.

Weddings are still held in the chapel. The museum hosts a vast array of finds dating back to the stone age. Several coin and artefact hoards are on display in a well-lit environment. The Jersey Hoard Le Catillon II is on full display behind a screen. Visitors can clearly see the hoard being dis assembled and the staff including Reg and Richard are more than happy to stop work and answer any questions.

Some hoard on display date back to the stone age.

Some hoard on display date back to the stone age.

There are several other hoards on display at the museum.

There are several other hoards on display at the museum.

The Jersey hoard so far June 2016

The museum purchased a laser scanner with metrology arm and can measure within 50 microns, that’s a 20th of a millimeter. The coin cleaning process consists of a mild acid soak and then gentle picking with a thorn as this will not damage the coins surface.

On a good day they can clean and record 200 coins.

On a good day they can clean and record 200 coins.

Reg and Richard have undertaken extensive training and now work at the museum cleaning and recording, they are now experts on Jersey coins and indeed historic Jersey. Here is a before and after.

So far the total amount of coins cleaned and recorded has reached 45000, mostly Silver but some Gold.

So far the total amount of coins cleaned and recorded has reached 45000, mostly Silver but some Gold.

In March 2015 coin number 12001 was recorded, making Catillon II the biggest Iron age coin hoard in western Europe beating the Marquanderie hoard which was also found in Jersey 1935 consisting of 12000 coins.

Items cleaned and recorded so far:

So far the total amount of coins cleaned and recorded has reached 45000, mostly Silver but some Gold.

Gold and precious pieces from the Jersey Hoard have been documented and preserved for future generations to enjoy.

Gold and precious pieces from the Jersey Hoard have been documented and preserved for future generations to enjoy.

  • Complete Gold Torcs 5
  • Pieces of Gold Torc 4
  • Gold Bracelets 3
  • Gold Rings 2
  • Gold sheet 2
  • Copper loops 2
  • Stones 1
  • Ingots 7
  • Silver wire 1
  • Decorative Gold pieces 3
  • Glass bead 1
  • Misc objects 6

During my visit a bronze age spear head had started to appear amongst the coins.

Coin types

Some Jersey coins were the XN series Silver based stators which were originally linked to the Abrincatui tribe from the Avranches region in Normandy, they are rare coins, many locals know them as “The Moon Stater” The hoard consisted of mainly coriosolitae staters and are common to Jersey.

The hoard consisted of mainly coriosolitae staters and are common to Jersey.

The hoard consisted of mainly coriosolitae staters and are common to Jersey.

Preservation

The hoard lives under a water vapor screen to mimic real underground conditions and preserve the coins and artifacts until they are ready to be removed.

The uncleaned items from the Jersey hoard live under a water vapor screen awaiting preservation.

The uncleaned items from the Jersey hoard live under a water vapor screen awaiting preservation.

The Replica

Neil Mahrer head conservator for the museum made a fantastic replica of Catillon II, all the coins are hand painted and look exactly like the real thing. It can be seen in the museum proudly on display in front of the real hoard.

Neil Mahrer, head conservator for the museum, made a fantastic replica of Catillon II for display.

Neil Mahrer, head conservator for the museum, made a fantastic replica of Catillon II for display.

View of the Jersey hoard replica on display.

View of the Jersey hoard replica on display.

 

Fact

Avranches is now twinned with St. Helier in Jersey. There is now a book available called Le Catillon II.

Signed copy of Catillon II by Reg Mead and Richard Miles.

Signed copy of Catillon II by Reg Mead and Richard Miles.

I have a signed copy of Catillon II by Reg Mead and Richard Miles, it’s free…All you need to do is register here at the The XP world-wide Forum and post yes please or a comment about this article under the Catillon II competition section.

Visiting La Hougue Bie
A visit to the La Hougue Bie in Jersey is a must for every detectorist the finds on display are truly amazing viewing the hoard in it’s natural form is a once in a lifetime opportunity, once it has been dis assembled and recorded it is possible we will never see it like this again.

*Important Note:
Please DO NOT take your detectors to the island unless you have special permission, customs and detecting laws are very strict.

We recommend staying at the Grand Jersey hotel.

Please drop into the XP forum and say Hi. Visit the XP world-wide Forum here.

If you have any nice XP finds, tips or XP detecting events we would love to incorporate them into our XP Social Media sections so please keep us posted.

Deus Hot Program Locates Nick Reynolds a Gold Hammered Coin

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This beautiful gold hammered was located with the XP DEUS metal detector.

44 years old Nick Reynolds was at a metal detective’s organised dig when he got a perfect signal, he dug down into the soft ploughed soil to see a Gold coin looking back at him.

The coin was instantly recorded with the on-site FLO (Finds Liaison Officer) and identified as an Edward III Half Noble.

nick-reynolds-deus

A proud Nick Reynolds with his DEUS metal detector holding this exciting find.

When I interviewed Nick just after he found the coin he told me how he started detecting in 1994, but after a shoulder operation he needed a lighter machine so he chose an XP Gold Maxx Power and some years later he upgraded to the Deus.

nick-reynolds-gold coin

A nice close up of the Gold Hammered coin found by DEUS detectorist Nick Reynolds on his dig.

 

Nick went on to say, since using the Deus with the 9” coil his finds rate is constantly very high…. especially using the “HOT” program.

Some of his best finds have come from investigating suspicious signals.

XP DEUS Locates 13 Gram Gold Nugget in Africa!

XP DEUS user locates an impressive 13 Gram gold nugget in Africa using the XP DEUS GoldField program 10. The actual recovery of this impressive find is shown in the video below.

The XP DEUS GoldField program was developed and perfected in the African gold fields. Complete details on the GoldField program 10 are shown at this link. The GoldField program is a turn-on-and-go preset mode that is simple to use.

Related Stories:

Half Gram Nugget at 6 Inches Deep!

Deus Finds Nice Nugget

My Beach Nugget

 

Gold Ingots Found with XP DEUS!

By Henry Parro

After finding one of the oldest gold coins in the Essex – Colchester region
of England last year, I wasn’t sure what to expect this year. As you can
see in the accompanying photos, I wasn’t let down. I was hunting in a
corner of a field where several years ago a piece of gold slag was found. I
hit an area that was full of iron and melted slag of various materials,
both ferrous and non-ferrous.

Henry Parro holding one of his recently found gold ingots.

Henry Parro holding one of his recently found gold ingots.

The XP sounded more like a popcorn machine rather than a detector. I worked the area slow and every now and then I would hear a non-ferrous tone. Digging down, I noticed that the soil was dark and consisted of ash indicating a fire at one point. The targets would be melted globs of metal. Due to the heavy iron content it was hard to dig just non-ferrous targets. I received one tone that was different from the rest. As I pulled the target out of the ground, I noticed the gold color. I washed it off to see it was a gold ingot!

I worked the area further until lunch, then we moved to another field. Later that evening back at the barn, several theories developed about the gold ingot. It was a mixture of gold and silver and melted hundreds of years ago. It was possible from a smelter or maker of coins and jewelry. The following day I headed back to the same area. I was joined by my hunting partner CT Todd. I turned reactivity up and iron volume down and it made a difference. By lunch we had found 3 more gold ingots.

While metal detecting with his DEUS, Henry Parro located these amazing gold ingots.

While metal detecting with his DEUS, Henry Parro and CT Todd located these amazing gold ingots.

This shows the versatility of the XP. Several other hunters were in the area with other brands and ventured toward the iron field but quickly gave up and walked away. Needless to say, I will be going back and there will be only one machine in my suitcase, the XP DEUS.

Editors note: Henry Parro owns Parros Gun Shop in Waterbury, VT. He uses the XP DEUS and is an authorized XP dealer.

Meteorite Hunting with my XP DEUS Detector

Here is a stunning picture of Twinks largest Franconia meteorite find.

Here is a stunning picture of Twinks largest Franconia meteorite find.

by Twink Monrad

Having hunted for meteorites at two meteorite strewn fields in the past, my detecting partner Don Morin and I were anxious to try out our new detectors at the two locations:  Gold Basin in northwestern Arizona and Franconia near Lake Havasu.

Both of these locations have yielded gold as well as meteorites. We used meteorites from prior trips to test with our XP DEUS machines and found that the Goldfield setting worked great for both.

Pictured above is a sampling of the variety of ammo that that Twink found while hunting for meteorites with the XP DEUS at Franconia

Pictured above is a sampling of the variety of ammo that that Twink found while hunting for meteorites with the XP DEUS at Franconia

Twinks detecting buddy Don Morin pictured with his XP DEUS. He has one of the larger 11" coils as well as the regular 9" coil.

Twinks detecting buddy Don Morin pictured with his XP DEUS. He has one of the larger 11″ coils as well as the regular 9″ coil.

While finding gold is never an easy or sure thing, finding meteorites in these two locations is much more difficult than in the past.  Gold Basin was discovered in 1995 and Franconia in 2002.

Thousands of hours of hunting have been put in by many hunters and one has to walk farther or dig deeper or just plain get lucky and find some that others have missed.

I was able to find a buried Gold Basin and Don found two Gold Basins with his 11”coil.  One was buried and one was on the surface. At the Franconia field I was fortunate to find a beautiful oriented Franconia stone meteorite buried 6 inches as well as a small iron meteorite which are peculiar to the Franconia meteorite field.

You can see a meteorite at the bottom of the hole which Twink located with her XP DEUS metal detector. This was located in the Franconia meteorite field near Lake Havasu in western Arizonza.

You can see a meteorite at the bottom of the hole which Twink located with her XP DEUS metal detector. This was located in the Franconia meteorite field near Lake Havasu in western Arizonza.

At Franconia we both found numerous buried projectiles and 30 and 50 caliber casings and the steel links that held the ammo together. These were used during WWII to train bomber and fighter pilots.

This is the beatiful Gold Basin Arizona meteorite field terrain. You are in a Joshua Tree forest.

This is the beatiful Gold Basin Arizona meteorite field terrain. You are in a Joshua Tree forest.

 

This is a photo of the ammo found by Twinks friend Don Morin at Franconia while hunting with the XP DEUS metal detector.

This is a photo of the ammo found by Twinks friend Don Morin at Franconia while hunting with the XP DEUS metal detector.

We both appreciated the light weight of the XP DEUS detectors as we seemed to never get tired as we did with the heavier units.  The wireless design is very helpful in our Arizona desert terrain as it is easy to swing the coil under bushes or next to large rocks without getting tangled.

We love our XP DEUS detectors and are looking forward to many more hunting trips in the desert.

As far as our frequent trips to local parks in Tucson, Arizona we are finding coins in areas that we have hunted earlier and feel that we are hearing things a bit deeper than before.

Pictured above, author Twink Monrad gets ready for a meteorite hunt with her XP DEUS metal detector.

Pictured above, author Twink Monrad gets ready for a meteorite hunt with her XP DEUS metal detector.

This week we were at one of the local swap meets before the vendors arrived and in the dirt I found an 1898 Indian Head penny in very good condition.  It may have been dropped recently but I did find it with my DEUS!

Twink Monrad

Oro Valley, Arizona

 

 

Pictured above is a Gold Basin meteorite. This is an exciting specimen and a good example of some of the more interesting finds that have turned up in this area.

Pictured above is a Gold Basin meteorite. This is an exciting specimen and a good example of some of the more interesting finds that have turned up in this area.

Editors note: Twink Monrad is a recognized meteorite hunter. Over the years she has found several notable meteorite finds. She located the “Golden Rule” and the “Golden Mile” meteorites which were classified at the University of Arizona and listed in the Cambridge Encycolpedia or Meteorites. More about Meteorite hunter Twink Monrad. Twink has even had an Asteroid (92297 Monrad) named after her!

Related Article: XP DEUS Meteorite Find Classified by Dr. Garvie at Arizona State University.

Related Article: Gold Basin and Franconia Meteorite Finds!

XP DEUS Produces Historic Colonial Period Finds in Southern New England

1789 George Washington Inaugural button

The recovery of this long-awaited prize, a 1789 George Washington Inaugural button, had been years in the making, but it was worth the wait (photo courtesy of Western & Eastern Treasures).

Colonial Period Finds by James Bailey

My second year of detecting with my XP Deus was in 2014, which I now look back on as the big year for historical button recoveries.  I focus my searching on colonial-period sites in southern New England.  My first year of detecting with my XP Deus was wonderfully productive, and I was hopeful of continued success in 2014.  Hope can be a powerful driving force, but hope alone is not enough.  Guideby thorough research and striving with persistence, I recovered several noteworthy finds in 2014, including two historical buttons.  Up to this time, I had recovered my full share of exciting finds from the Colonial Period, but I had never found any button that deeply stirred my passion for discovering lost history.  After the recovery of two late 18th century buttons at two different sites two months apart, I had a whole different experience in finding mere buttons!

William and Mary Period drawer pull

Identification of this William and Mary Period drawer pull helped to date the GWI button site back to the late 17th century (photo courtesy of Western & Eastern Treasures).

The first button was recovered in a wide-open expanse of grass where a colonial-period house once stood.  The lay of the land offered no indication as to what might be found beneath the surface; you needed to pay your dues in research to have any assurances of finding something worthwhile.  I certainly needed those assurances because the finds I recovered on my first day were all deeply buried and thus scarce in quantity.   I was rewarded with one outstanding find (perhaps a story for another time), and the payout for my efforts along with my knowledge of the site’s history prompted me to make a return visit.  My second hunt also yielded only a few old flat buttons, yet the quality of what I recovered easily trumped the low yield of finds.  At this site, it was all about quality – not quantity.  Upon the recovery of one of the buttons, I noticed an apparent design.  I lightly cleaned it with a soft bristle tooth brush, which I carry with me while hunting.  A light brushing revealed a cluster of stars decorating the face of the button.  With a bit of optimism, I carefully counted a total of 13 stars.  Thinking of the 13 original colonies, I thought that perhaps this button was something special.  I held off on any further examination of the button while at the site.

King George coppers, a Fugio copper, a New Jersey copper, a Nova Constellatio copper

The GWI button site also offered up a wide-variety of early coins – King George coppers, a Fugio copper, a New Jersey copper, a Nova Constellatio copper, and U.S. large cents. All were found with the XP Deus (photo courtesy of Western & Eastern Treasures).

Upon returning home, I checked for the button’s identity in the standard reference on the subject matter, Record of American Uniform and Historical Buttons, by Alphaeus Albert.     I found no matches in Albert’s comprehensive guide, but later that night I took a second look at the button before placing it in a container of mineral oil for preservation purposes.  After further brushing, I noticed an odd, uneven rim around the button, and then I saw it!  A rattlesnake in the shape of a circle bordered the button’s edge with a clutch of 13 eggs.  I went back to Albert’s book and found the exact design in the section on early patriotic buttons.  The design was popular in the late 18th century and was likely produced in France for sale to proud Americans of the fledging United States of America.  The earliest known use of a snake symbol to represent the American colonies dates back to the first appearance of a political cartoon in the colonies.  Credited to Benjamin Franklin, the snake symbolized unity for the colonies at the start of the French and Indian War in 1754.  The image of a snake, particularly a rattlesnake, would be used again years later during the Revolutionary War, as various militia units and the Continental Navy adopted the symbol for their flags.  Snake and stars buttons are now coveted finds for any detectorist looking to recover some real history.  Several varieties of these buttons exist, and all are highly prized by collectors.

snake and stars patriotic button

This highly collectible snake and stars patriotic button was a great find all by itself, but it was also a harbinger of a greater historical button find to soon follow.

In the category of buttons, my new recovery of snake and stars specimen was my best such find to date, but it would be a short-lived distinction.  I knew of one other possibility – a grand Americana button recovery that I had been hoping to recover for years without success, yet I would soon have my XP Deus within striking distance of this impressive historical find as well.   

Two months later, I was on my third search of a cellar hole that dated back to the late 17th century.  I had been hammering this site over the past week, as the entire site had been recently leveled with a bulldozer.  I was determined to take full advantage of the exciting after-effect.  The heavy excavating resulted in ideal site conditions, as I recovered 10 early coppers – King George halfpence coins, early state-issued coppers, and early U.S. large cents on my first two trips to the site, along with an assortment of early buttons, buckle fragments, and other promising finds.  

painting by Ramon de Elorriaga, The Inauguration of George Washington.

GWI buttons offer a vivid connection to a specific time and place during the early formative years in U.S. history, as seen here in this detailed painting by Ramon de Elorriaga, The Inauguration of George Washington.

My third visit got off to a slow start with the recovery of a single flat button and little else.  I continued my search undeterred and soon recovered a worn silver Spanish half real coin about two hours into the hunt.  It’s my standard practice to follow up with a few circular sweeps around a noteworthy recovery, and on my first turn, I came upon a strong, solid, high-tone target.  A few shovel scoops of dirt failed to produce the target, but upon stirring up the soil by hand, a huge copper coin came into view, or so it seemed.  I was puzzled by the large size of the coin but only briefly.  A coin’s planchets would have been thicker and heavier.  What I had was much lighter.  It was a huge flat coat button measuring 34 mm is size (a golf ball in comparison measures in a bit larger at 42 mm).  An exciting thought flashed through my mind as I considered a possibility.  I closely examined the face of the button and noticed a design, a realization of my highest hopes for a find of a lifetime.  At the center of the button, the initials GW were clearly visible, and in smaller type, the motto – LONG LIVE THE PRESIDENT – was faintly visible behind a centuries-old encrustation of dirt and patina.  I had just recovered a long-awaited dream find, a George Washington Inaugural (GWI) button from 1789.  Corrosion to the button was likely minimal, as the design appeared to be sharp and clear.  I checked the backside of the button and found the shank intact and well-shaped as the day it was made.  I continued my search of the property, recovering one more copper and nothing else of note. 

Taken moments after discovering the GWI button

Always pack a camera. Taken moments after discovering the GWI button, this photo perfectly captures the thrilling experience.

The button was soaked in mineral oil and periodically cleaned with a soft-bristle toothbrush for several days to remove the build-up of bonded dirt and slight corrosion.  My careful, patient cleaning helped reclaim a stunning piece of early American history.  For a dug button well over two centuries old, it had plenty of eye appeal – an even patina, little wear, minimal corrosion, and even traces of gold gilt.  

My 1789 GWI button, a GW-11 Variety as detailed in Record of American Uniform and Historical Buttons, is from the first inauguration of President George Washington.  GWI buttons from the first and second inauguration amount to at least 20 known varieties.  These buttons were likely made available to Washington’s supporters and dignitaries for the inauguration, but most were purchased from vendors by an adoring public eager to have a memento of the historic event.  While my snake and stars button in dug condition is valued at several hundred dollars, my GWI button is considerably more valuable. 

1786 New Jersey (Nova Caesarea in Latin) copper

This 1786 New Jersey (Nova Caesarea in Latin) copper was one of several early coppers found at the GWI button site that thankfully showed only a minimal amount of corrosion (photo courtesy of Western & Eastern Treasures).

There is great demand for these buttons among collectors of early Americana, political memorabilia, buttons, and coins.  The variety of button that I recovered is quite popular with collectors, and individual buttons of this variety in similar condition have sold in the past for $2000 – $3000. There appears to be a growing demand for these buttons, as another GW-11 Variety button in less than perfect condition recently sold at auction for the substantial and surprising sum of $6000.

The recovery of the snake and stars button and the George Washington Inaugural button from two different sites in a two month time span was fantastic.  Certainly, the excitement of these discoveries do fade over time, but what thrilling finds are yet to come?  Equipped with my XP Deus, supported by research, and driven by a bit or perseverance, I hope to be only a few swings away from another big discovery.       

Two Cousins Find Ancient Gold with XP DEUS Metal Detector

Cousins Derek Chuck and Duane Downing shown with their XP DEUS metal detectors.

Cousins Derek Chuck and Duane Downing shown with their XP DEUS metal detectors.

Cousins Derek Chuck and Duane Downing are two very happy XP DEUS  users. They have always searched together as a team and like to compare each others signals.

Duane had only owned his DEUS with the 11” coil for two weeks when he called Derek over to compare a signal.

It was hitting 69 – 72 on his wrist mounted headphone module along with a very positive audio sound.

They started to carefully dig in the Lincolnshire soil, Derek told me the hole was over 12” (30cm) deep when a bright Gold object started to appear.

He reached down with his hand and slowly pulled out a large Gold Torc which he said “looked like the day it was dropped!”

I asked Derek what was the first thing he did, he replied “The Gold Dance!”

Derek Chuck shown holding the beautiful Gold Torc recently located with his XP DEUS metal detector.

Derek Chuck shown holding the beautiful Gold Torc recently located with his XP DEUS metal detector.

This wonderful piece of ancient gold is still undergoing investigation with the British Museum and local experts. So far it’s true identity is not fully known.

Recent reports say it is possibly Irish Gold and dates back to over 1000 BC. The finds liaison officer who was on site told the guys to keep searching as they believe it is not a single lost item and more likely to be a part of a bigger offering to the ancient gods.

This Gold Torc located by Derek Chuck with the XP DEUS metal detector is believed to be Irish Gold that dates back to over 1000 BC!

This Gold Torc located by Derek Chuck with the XP DEUS metal detector is believed to be Irish Gold that dates back to over 1000 BC!

Derek and Duane are still searching for the missing pieces.

All at XP wish them the very best of luck and hopefully they will have something more to report as the UK treasure act progresses.