XP DEUS V4.0 Software and the High Frequency Coil

Subtle Changes Make a Difference in the Field!

By Andy Sabisch

Author Andy Sabisch pictured with the DEUS equipped with the new 9" Round DD High Frequency coil, Version 4 software and the long awaited XP MI-6 Wireless PInpointer.

Author Andy Sabisch pictured with the DEUS equipped with the new 9″ Round DD High Frequency coil, Version 4 software and the long awaited XP MI-6 Wireless PInpointer.

The long-awaited DEUS V4.0 software update was released in March 2017 and while some might have expected more features thanks to rumors that were rampant on the Internet, it truly takes the DEUS to the next level in terms of cutting-edge performance. If you think about it, how many detector manufacturers, or manufacturers of any electronic equipment for that matter, offer updates that improve functionality at no cost! Rather than simply releasing a DEUS II and forcing people to buy the newest detector in the series, XP provides the upgrade through a simple download that takes minutes to perform.

XP has released a spec sheet showing what was added to V4.0, so rather than repeating all of them here, I wanted to touch on the key features that will interest U.S. hunters. Obviously the one thing that V4.0 offers users is the ability to connect with the new wireless waterproof pinpointer (the MI-6) as well as the two new High Frequency (HF) search coils. I will touch on the HF coil in this review but the MI-6 will receive a separate review due to the myriad of features it offers. Other features added to V4.0 include a new Reactivity setting of 2.5, improved ground tracking, expanded audio tone range, a much more usable X-Y screen to help identify iron before you dig it and improved non-motion modes which can be used for searching as well as pinpointing. Other features such as the 2 new preset modes, the Smartphone app integration, an increased discrimination span which drops into the negative range and faster “touch-pad response” on the remote control will be of use to some but are not features that really put more in one’s pouch at the end of the day for most U.S. hunters.

Well what about the new HF coils? Like most, I felt that they were primarily designed for prospecting applications and since there are not a lot of gold nuggets being found in the Eastern U.S., I was not overly excited when I looked at them as possible additions to my DEUS arsenal. Fortunately – if you can say that – I had a severe allergic reaction to some prescribed medication that landed me in the hospital and kept me out of the field for a few weeks. During that time, I contacted several people that I knew in Europe and the U.K. that were trying out the new HF coil and they were quite excited about how it performed on coins and smaller relics. After getting some pointers from them, I had the opportunity to get one and start putting it through its paces.

The backyard of our house is the perfect testing ground for detectors. The house was built in 1843 and the relatively small grassy area is littered with 100’s of square nails along with rusted junk that has collected in the ground over the past 175 years. My wife and I have hunted it countless times but are usually able to find something of note. Rather than taking a new detector to a new site and then touting coins and other items recovered without checking to see if other detectors would have found them provides little truly objective evidence as to how it actually performs. Taking the DEUS with V4.0 loaded onto it and switching out the stock coil for the 9” HF coil, I headed out into the backyard. I wanted to hear the iron so I set the DISCRIMINATION at “10” and the IRON VOLUME at “2”. Opting for 4-Tones, I had to test targets to get the breakpoints dialed in but that took less than 10 minutes. I changed the REACTIVITY to “2.5” to see if this would help pick out good targets from the iron and after making a few more tweaks, saved two programs – one using 14.4 kHz and the other using 28.8 kHz. I worked one small section which I knew was infested with iron and marked 5 potential targets. I had the advantage of having another DEUS with V3.2 to check the targets before digging them – which is the only true way to see if the new features really make a difference in the field… comparing targets BEFORE recovering them.

An 1885 Indian Head Penny hidden amongst several nails including the one shown was recovered from a depth of 8 inches.

An 1885 Indian Head Penny hidden amongst several nails including the one shown was recovered from a depth of 8 inches.

The first one turned out to be an old ball of tinfoil at 7” which the HF coil / V4.0 combo hit with a solid target ID (although a low #) ; however, the V3.2 / LF coil struggled to get a consistent response. The next signal was so clear and consistent with the V4.0 / HF coil in both frequencies that I questioned how we could have missed it previously. Well, the V3.2 / LF coil would produce a response occasionally and even then, with audio and visual indication bouncing all over. Not a target I would have recovered unless time was not an issue. From a solid 8” I recovered a crusty coin and a large rusted spike. Cleaning revealed the coin was an 1885 Indian Head that had been holed years ago to wear as a necklace. The next two targets turned out to be foil and as I found with the first target, the response from the V4.0 / HF coil DEUS was much sharper and repeatable than the V3.2 / LF coil DEUS with similar settings (Reactivity was set at “2” on the V3.2 DEUS). The last one was iffy but clearly there was a high tone amongst the low iron tones on the V4.0 / HF coil unit. The V3.2 / LF coil unit as well as another high-end detector considered to be on-par with the DEUS did not see anything but iron in the area. There was iron and I pulled out three rusted nails yet the pinpointer kept saying there was more in the hole. The next item recovered was a rusted piece of pipe about 1” long and finally I found a brass 1800’s suspender clip in the edge of the hole at better than 8”! I was quite surprised at the target separation afforded by V4.0 and the detection depth provided by the HF coil in a non-prospecting application. As they say a picture says a 1,000 words and the two keepers shown here along with the trash that was in the same hole is a testament to how well the new V4.0 DEUS performs in the field and when coupled with the HF coil, offers flexibility that is unmatched.

Nails and a rusted piece of iron pipe had masked this suspender clip from the 1800’s despite searching the area countless times before with a number of high-end machines.

Nails and a rusted piece of iron pipe had masked this suspender clip from the 1800’s despite searching the area countless times before with a number of high-end machines.

In summary, I was pleasantly surprised at how the HF coil performed in a challenging environment. It does like low-conductive targets such as tin foil but beach hunters will love its sensitivity to small gold jewelry. Coin and relic hunters will find that having the option to switch between the LF and HF coils combined with V4.0 will allow finds to be made in areas that are un-huntable with other detectors due to the amount of ferrous trash present. The software (4.0) is available as a no-cost download from XP Metal Detectors and the HF coils, while not cheap, will help you find more in sites you and others have written off. Don’t forget, you can mount the HF coil on a spare shaft and in essence have two detectors for the price of the coil alone. XP continues to raise the bar with their flagship detector and they are not content… more features and functionality will be developed that all of us can benefit for in the field.

The Deus Advantage – Searching for Colonial-Period Finds with Target Separation

by Jim Bailey

17th and 18th Century New England Metal Detecting Finds: First 6 Months with my Deus Metal Detector

What a sight! Here’s an image of the gold cufflinks as they emerged from the soil at the site of a long-vanished colonial-period house site.

What a sight! Here’s an image of the gold cufflinks as they emerged from the soil at the site of a long-vanished colonial-period house site.

I live in Southern New England, which was settled far back in the 1630’s and today offers fantastic opportunities for the determined detectorist searching out colonial-period treasure in the form of coins and other finds.  I focus nearly all of my metal detecting efforts on colonial-period sites as it’s my passion.  The recovery of exceptional colonial-period finds does not come easy.  There are some requirements to be met:  Unless you’re content with the recovery of one or two lucky finds, research is an absolute must. Plus you’ll need to put in a good deal of time (a lot of digging).  You’ll need a quality machine.  And finally, you’ll need to stay positive while striving for your goal of that certain coin or relic.

Obverse view of an 1856 Liberty Seated quarter – This Liberty Seated quarter was an unexpected find, as it was the only coin recovered from a large cornfield.

Obverse view of an 1856 Liberty Seated quarter – This Liberty Seated quarter was an unexpected find, as it was the only coin recovered from a large cornfield.

With only six months experience with the Deus, I still consider myself a beginner, yet my searching with it has yielded a remarkable score of artifacts from several sites, most of which I have diligently searched over the years.”   Jim Baily, Author and Deus Metal Detector User

I’ve been very conservative in the purchase of detectors over many years, having purchased only two machines in nearly 20 years.  I put a good deal of stock into my research and still do today.  I made the jump and purchased a new XP Deus metal detector in June of 2013.  Over the previous year, I had a good deal of success in recovering finds of greater quantity and quality, so I decided to really go for it with the purchase of an XP Deus.  It’s now the start of 2014.  Six months have passed since I took up the XP Deus, and its purchase was the best decision I ever made in my pursuit of the hobby.  I won’t detail all of the features and qualities that make the Deus such a remarkable, standout machine; I’d rather write about what I found with the Deus and specifically how the Deus made it possible.

Obverse view of a 1722 Hibernia half-pence coin - This 1722 Hibernia coin is amazingly well-preserved for a ground-dug copper coin from a plowed field.

Obverse view of a 1722 Hibernia half-pence coin – This 1722 Hibernia coin is amazingly well-preserved for a ground-dug copper coin from a plowed field.

With only six months experience with the Deus, I still consider myself a beginner, yet my searching with it has yielded a remarkable score of artifacts from several sites, most of which I have diligently searched over the years.  I took my Deus on a trial run back in late June to a large property where two colonial-period houses once stood.  One house site dates back to the mid-18th Century, and the other dates back even further to the mid-17th Century.  Both houses were razed long ago; nothing remains but unremarkable hayfields that offer no clues as to what remains hidden below the surface for the past 250+ years.  My first trip out with my Deus to the older house site produced a few early coppers and buttons, including a tombac (brass alloy) nipple button that dates back to the mid-17th Century.  I also dug a fair amount of ferrous material and hot rocks, as I had to contend with the learning curve that comes with a new detector.  I was encouraged by these results, as I found more in less time and with less experience in handling my Deus than I had on past visits to the site with my old detectors.

Obverse view of an 1847 Liberty Seated half-dime - The coin has great detail and nice eye appeal.

Obverse view of an 1847 Liberty Seated half-dime – The coin has great detail and nice eye appeal.

I returned to the site only a week later with some new settings for my Deus, which largely eliminated any further digging of ferrous targets and hot rocks.  I only had a few hours to search and hoped for an exciting find.  I would not be disappointed with the outcome.  After recovering a few buttons and bits of lead, I dug at a promising signal and spotted a shiny, delicate object in the bottom of an overturned plug of hay grass.  It appeared to be some form of jewelry, which I hardly expected to recover on a colonial-period site.  It was a completely intact silver cufflink dating to around 1750!  I had seen many fine examples of 18th Century silver cufflinks found by other detectorists, but the stunning appearance of what I found was unlike all the rest.  It was in perfect condition and consisted of clear stones that were set in silver and joined by an S-shaped link.  Each stone had a strange gold-colored center.  After taking a few photos and a short video, I excitedly continued my search, and the finds kept coming – a musket ball, another early tombac nipple button, brass furniture tacks, a decorative pewter button

After finding the gold cufflink, a follow-up search with my Deus metal detector produced other finds – early copper coins, knee buckles, and other noteworthy recoveries.

After finding the gold cufflink, a follow-up search with my Deus metal detector produced other finds – early copper coins, knee buckles, and other noteworthy recoveries.

with a wedge-shaped, drilled shank dating from 1700-1765, and a trifid spoon handle end dating to the late 17th Century.  As expected, I also recovered mashed up bits of brass and lead, but I ended my hunt with the recovery of one more piece of old colonial-period silver in the form of a large sewing needle, also known as a bodkin.  It was used for threading ribbons and cords, while fancier examples were also used as a hair pin.  Bodkins, especially whole specimens, are rarely found even on archaeological excavations; and nearly all the examples found by detectorists that I saw online were recovered in England.  As the Deus had led me from one target to the next, I wondered how so much could have gone undetected in the past.

The number of high-toned targets that I encountered on my first big search was more than surprising; it was a revelation.  I knew the field had lots of potential based on my research and past finds (early coppers, spur buckles, seal spoon fragments, etc.), but nothing exceptional had been found until now.  After thoroughly searching the property for years, I had reasoned that my lack of quality finds simply reflected the early occupants’

These center nipple buttons and trifid spoon handle are exciting finds, as they solidly date back to the 17th Century.

These center nipple buttons and trifid spoon handle are exciting finds, as they solidly date back to the 17th Century.

social status; they were dirt poor, having only possessions of the most basic and meager sort.  I couldn’t have been more wrong!  A considerable amount of colonial-period material was waiting to be found.  I only needed better technology to recover it, which the Deus provided.  The Deus is extremely sensitive, hitting on bird shot and other minuscule targets at impressive depths, but I believe that the capability of the Deus in regards to target separation is what made all the difference.  This target separation is made possible by advancements in recovery time with the XP Deus, setting it far apart from all other metal detectors.  While a few of my finds were deeply buried, most finds were at a moderate or surprisingly shallow depth.  In comparison to producing a single stray copper coin or button from the field with my old detector, the experience with the Deus in recovering numerous targets felt like an opening of the floodgates.

Thorough searching with another high-end detector failed to locate these finds. Remarkably, they were found with an XP Deus during an exciting one-hour search.

Thorough searching with another high-end detector failed to locate these finds. Remarkably, they were found with an XP Deus during an exciting one-hour search.

The cufflink was later identified as a fine example of Stuart Crystal jewelry, which was popular from about the mid-17th Century through the end of the 18th Century in the styling of rings, pendants, and, of course, cufflinks.  While some Stuart Crystal jewelry was fashioned with glass or paste stones, my find was made from carved rock of crystal quartz, and the strange gold center was a delicate arrangement of fine, twisted gold wire; it’s a marvelous example of the craftsmanship practiced by jewelers back in England during the mid-18th Century, and I found it in a hay field with an XP Deus.

I kept up the search with my Deus over the next several months and recovered better finds that far exceeded my long-held expectations about what was out there.  I revisited a few sites that I had not searched in years after writing them off as non-productive and likely hunted out long before I first arrived.  I now went back to search one such spot with one of my detecting partners, who is also a new Deus owner.  We did not yet fully understand target separation, and expected a dismal hunt of an hour or so before leaving the field to seek our

Here’s a group shot of the better finds recovered with an XP Deus over a six-month period.

Here’s a group shot of the better finds recovered with my XP Deus over a six-month period.

fortunes elsewhere; however, we were happily surprised to encounter numerous high-toned targets.  I recovered a few shoe buckle fragments, small lead shot, a thimble, and buttons, including an early tombac nipple button.  Indeterminate bits of brass and melted lead slowed my progress, but I steadily dug away and recovered a 1776 Spanish one real coin.

I searched a new field that offered up very few finds, but I managed to come up with an 1856 Liberty Seated quarter while walking back to my car.  Despite my fast pace, the recovery time provided by my Deus managed to hit on the coin loud and clear, as I hastily swept the search coil side-to-side.

While most dug Tombac buttons are plain in appearance, this example I found from the mid-17th Century has a decorative design.

While most dug Tombac buttons are plain in appearance, this example I found from the mid-17th Century has a decorative design.

I had a setback during the fall season, when I was denied permission to continue my search of the field that produced the Stuart Crystal silver cufflink.  A contractor for one of the residential homes on the property suddenly showed up while I was searching the field on my first return trip since finding the cufflink three months prior.  Although I had been searching the property with permission for several years, the contractor promptly kicked me off the field.

Despite the unfortunate turn of events, all was not lost, as I still had permission to search a field at the opposite end of the property where another colonial-period house once stood.  I had found Spanish silver coins in this field the previous year, so I stopped by in the late afternoon hoping to save the day with a good find.  My hopes would soon be answered.

I only had an hour or so to search before dusk arrived.  While firing up the settings on my Deus, I ran over to the approximate area that produced the Spanish silver coins from last year.  Although this field had lots of potential for terrific finds, my thoughts kept drifting back to the other field and the finds from early summer – the Stuart Crystal cufflink, the bodkin, and other finds.  I thought most of all about the possible finds that would be left behind and remain undiscovered.  While trying to stifle these thoughts, I took only a few steps at the second site, and my Deus hit on a solid target.  I

This Spanish silver coin, a one real, shows some obvious wear and tear, but it has a clear, sharp date of 1776. The date was most appropriate is it was found only a few days before the 4th of July.

This Spanish silver coin, a one real, shows some obvious wear and tear, but it has a clear, sharp date of 1776. The date was most appropriate is it was found only a few days before the 4th of July.

quickly removed a cut plug of hay grass and saw the unmistakable flash of gold.  Out of all the possibilities, I had found another cufflink – a gold cufflink!  Like the silver cufflink, it was in superb condition and completely intact.  The cufflink was octagonal in shape and engraved.  After taking a few pictures and a short video, I continued my search and recovered a 1782 Spanish one real coin, a complete knee buckle, a copper, and one musket ball.  I had intensely searched this exact area with my old detector last year after finding the Spanish silver coins, so the recovery of the latest finds with my new Deus was remarkable.  A day-long return trip to the field on the following week did not produce any further gold or Spanish silver coins, but I did recover three coppers, two knee buckles, a few buttons, and other finds.  One of the coppers is a 1722 Hibernia half-pence coin.  It’s in exceptional condition for a dug coin from a plowed field.

The octagonal shape of the gold cufflink was popular through most of the 18th century until falling out of fashion by the 1780’s.  I had a local jeweler test the cufflink.  It’s made of 22k gold.  The hand engraved design on the gold cufflink shows a splashing whale’s tail.  This design makes perfect sense, as the site of my search is located in close proximity to a seaport town that took up whaling back in the 1740’s.  Examples of cufflinks similar to what I recovered appear to be nearly non-existent, as a search of the internet (Google images, etc.) only produced a single obscure image of an octagonal gold cufflink from the same period.

This four-inch trifid spoon handle fragment dates back to the 17th Century.

This four-inch trifid spoon handle fragment dates back to the 17th Century.

I was eager to include one more site during the break-in period for my Deus.  It was another colonial-period house site that vanished from the landscape years ago.  It now only exists in the form of material remains scattered across a farm field.  It’s my favorite place to detect, as it offered up my best find to date – a rare Oak Tree shilling, back in 2006.  I’ve continued to pound this field hard over the past six years hoping for another such coin, while steadily thinning out most signals that read above iron.  But now I was on it with the Deus!  I found nothing that could compare with the 18th Century gold cufflink; that’s a tough act to follow.  However, my search with the Deus produced a few good coin recoveries.  Along with a couple of unidentifiable coppers, I found an 1847 Liberty Seated half-dime with sharp detail and a Spanish half real cob coin.  The worn cob cannot be precisely dated, but it likely dates from the late-17th Century to early 18th Century.  Along with the coins, I recovered musket balls, leather mounts, a spur fragment, a four-inch trifid spoon handle fragment [see see example Met Museum-external site], and an early tombac nipple.  Most of these finds dated back to the 17th Century.  The finds recovered with the Deus had certainly exceeded what I had found on past searches of the field with my old metal detector; moreover, a leather mount and the trifid spoon handle was recovered in the immediate area of where I had found the Oak Tree shilling, even though this area had been subject to intensive searching over the years for obvious reasons.

 

Despite being covered in dirt, the Stuart Crystal cufflink has a pristine appearance and displays a barely visible gold center. Stuart Crystal jewelry was fashionable in the mid-17th through the end of the 18th Century.

Despite being covered in dirt, the Stuart Crystal cufflink has a pristine appearance and displays a barely visible gold center. Stuart Crystal jewelry was fashionable in the mid-17th through the end of the 18th Century.

Software upgrades, an innovative lightweight design, and wireless technology are some of the features that are unique to the Deus, but its target separation is what I value most.  The advantage of target separation is clearly evident to me.  On multiple occasions while digging for a target, I’ve removed one or even two ferrous (iron) objects with the aid of my pinpointer before locating the source of the high-toned signal given by my Deus, i.e., a coin, button, or buckle fragment.

A singular focus on detection depth is a misguided half measure, as target separation is equally important.  Detectorists searching a colonial-period house site face much difficulty in locating a few coins and other select finds from a proportionally vast amount of ferrous targets.  How much ferrous material is out there on such a site?  Detailed reports on full-scale archaeological excavations of colonial-period house sites provide sobering figures of over 8,000 nails being recovered from a single colonial period house site by means of sifting.  In addition to

The hand engraved design on the gold cufflink shows a splashing whale’s tail. A museum curator described the design as “quite unusual” in comparison to other designs found on cufflinks from the mid-18th Century.

The hand engraved design on the gold cufflink shows a splashing whale’s tail. A museum curator described the design as “quite unusual” in comparison to other designs found on cufflinks from the mid-18th Century.

thousands of nails, a detectorist can expect to encounter much more ferrous material in the form of lost and discarded farm equipment, hand tools, door hardware, cooking/fireplace accessories, ox shoes, etc.  A detectorist faces a daunting challenge in seeing through an enormous amount of ferrous material, and blind faith in a detector’s discrimination settings is not the end-all solution.  Discrimination is too often viewed in terms of the time and effort saved digging junk targets, while no consideration is given to its occasional costs, i.e., the loss of select targets that are choked away with the nulling of abundant ferrous targets.  A detector’s capabilities in regards to discrimination is only as good as the detector’s recovery time in providing separate signals for two different targets even when they are located in extremely close proximity to each other.  All these considerations come

Reverse view of a Spanish silver one-real cob - It’s a hammered coin that likely dates from late-17th Century to early-18th Century.

Reverse view of a Spanish silver one-real cob – It’s a hammered coin that likely dates from late-17th Century to early-18th Century.

down to target separation, and only the Deus offers a level of target separation equal to the task, as seen with my Deus in locating numerous quality finds that went unseen over many long hunts with other high-end detectors I’ve used.

While riding out the current winter season, I’ll be compiling a long list of sites to search with my Deus, including a considerable number of old sites that require a second look.  If my finds over the past six months offer some indication of what to expect in the future, 2014 will hopefully provide big finds and lots of excitement.

 

XP DEUS 11″ Round Waterproof DD Search Coil Field Test

by Andy Sabisch

After locating this 1915 Gold Indian Head coin while testing the new 11" Deus Coil, Author Andy Sabisch said "My fingers were shaking as I saw a $2 1/2 Indian Head gold piece laying in my palm."

After locating this 1915 Gold Indian Head coin while testing the new 11″ Deus Coil, Author Andy Sabisch said “My fingers were shaking as I saw a $2 1/2 Indian Head gold piece laying in my palm.”

The XP team under the direction of Alain Loubet has never been one to rest on their laurels once a first-rate product has been designed and released.  They seem to thrive on challenges and finding new products or functionality that can be added to existing products.  This has been the driving force for what keeps XP pushing the bounds of metal detection technology and raising the bar against which other detectors are gauged.  The recent release of V3.X – which took more than a year to develop – added new features and performance to the Deus.  During this period, XP was also working on developing a new search coil which would produce increased detection depth and ground coverage while minimizing any increase in weight.  Being active hunters themselves, the XP team has always looked at the end-user’s experience as being an essential part of the design of any product and this approach was maintained during the development of the new 11-inch round search coil for the Deus with weight, balance and performance all being key factors in the project.

Author Andy Sabisch carefully retrieves a target while field testing the new XP DEUS 11" round waterproof DD search coil.

Author Andy Sabisch carefully retrieves a target while field testing the new XP DEUS 11″ round waterproof DD search coil.

Since 2009, the stock 9-inch search coil has proven to provide users with excellent target separation and detection depth on sites around the world.  The optional 11″x13″ coil has also been well accepted by users looking for more ground coverage and in less-trashy or target-filled sites, has done a first-rate job in “bringing home the goodies” although some felt that the additional weight and the balance point were factors that deserved consideration when opting to add one to their collection of accessories.  Based on requests from Deus owners as well as the desire to expand the versatility of their flagship detector, XP started to work on a new coil which would bridge the gap between the two that were already available.  What might have seemed like a simple project that just involved fabricating a new shell became much more involved.  Alain and his team wanted to boost performance and reduce weight in the new coil.  After countless hours and field trials, the 11-inch round coil was unveiled and the initial reports from the field have indicated that it was well worth the wait.

So what is different about this new accessory for the Deus other than being a little larger and why should you give serious consideration to adding one to your metal detecting arsenal?  Well let’s take a look at what XP has done and see what it does in the field which is all that really matters in the end isn’t it?

As I mentioned in the introduction section above, Alain and his team spent a great deal of time designing this accessory and it is not simply a different sized coil; a good deal of effort went into the design both internally as well as in the construction itself.  The first thing that becomes evident when picking one up is the weight of the coil.  Unlike the 11″x13″ coil which weighs just over half a pound more than the stock 9-inch coil, the new 11-inch coil weighs just a few ounces more thanks to some innovative design in the coil molding and changes in the “ingredients.”  Now the concern of increased weight when opting for a larger coil has been virtually eliminated.

Located in a hole that was deeper than his ProPointer, Andy Sabisch located a boxing medal engraved with the date "9-9-30" and the words "2nd place" marked on it.

Located in a hole that was deeper than his ProPointer, Andy Sabisch located a boxing medal engraved with the date “9-9-30″ and the words “2nd place” marked on it.

Another feature of the new coil is that there have been changes internally in terms of the design of the coil’s circuitry and windings which produce increased detection depth even on coin-sized targets and, as one knows, if you are in a site where depth is king, even an additional inch of detecting depth can often reopen sites others (including yourself) have written off as being worked out.

So enough of the technical details, I’m sure everyone is ready to ask the million-dollar question which is “So how does it perform in the field?”  Well, after spending a good deal of time running it through its paces on a wide range of sites in the mid-West, Florida and Pennsylvania as well as lending the test coil to a fellow Deus user, I am hoping that the remainder of this report will answer that question.

As I have said countless times before, air tests are great to help learn what targets sound like and see what impact specific adjustments have on detection depth or response; however, the true measure of how a detector or new coil performs is to test it on actual in-ground targets.  With that, my initial tests were conducted in my test garden.  The fact that the 11-inch coil comes complete with a lower shaft made alternating between the stock coil and the new 11-inch a snap . . . one can’t beat true wireless technology!  With settings unchanged between the two coils, the 11-inch was clearly hitting my test items harder than the stock coil.  On the deepest targets, the TID values appeared with the 11-inch while the stock coil only produced a good audio and a sliver of black on the horseshoe icon.

The first site I opted to visit was a vacant lot just outside of town due to the lack of rain the area had been experiencing.  Even with careful recovery techniques, I knew that parks and schools would have brown spots within a week if I tried to hunt them.  The home had been demolished more than two decades ago and the site was littered with trash from the structure – nails, pieces of wire, bits of metal from the roof, etc.  Despite the larger diameter, the 11-inch coil was able to easily separate signals and several keepers including 4 Wheat cents, a 1944 Mercury dime and a “Good for 10c” token from a long-closed local business were recovered.  By increasing the REACTIVITY to “2″ and slowing the sweep speed a little, I was able to pick out every target that the 9-inch coil had on the first pass through the trashiest sections of the property.  I have always found that by marking targets and then comparing detectors or even different coils before disturbing the soil, one can get a much better picture of how the equipment is actually functioning and what the differences in performance actually are.  A no-date Buffalo nickel and a 1901 Indian Head that was resting at a measured 9″+ at the edge of the remains of the path provided a great end to this hunt.  The Indian Head had produced a solid signal with the 11-inch coil; however, the 9-inch at similar settings gave a marginal signal that might have been passed by had I not marked it with the larger coil which showed the increased performance offered by the new coil.

During a trip to Florida with my daughter, I tried the coil with a modified saltwater beach program that I’ve used with good results in areas where black sand and salt co-exist.  The 11-inch coil performed flawlessly and several coins were recovered from depths that made me think I was running a multi-frequency or pulse-type detector.  Unfortunately I only had a hand scoop along and near the water’s edge, the hole would fill in faster than I could remove the slurry which resulted in the deeper targets being left for the next beach hunter that was better equipped.  The added coverage provided by the 11-inch coil along with the minimal weight difference as compared to the stock coil makes the new coil ideally suited for beach hunters where depth and coverage are key factors in determining one’s success.

My time to hunt with the Deus on a trip to Pennsylvania was limited but I opted to hit two sites that I have searched whenever I am in the area for close to 20 years.  Signals were few and far between as expected but 6 coins dating back to the 1890′s and a few little trinkets that are always welcome additions to my collection were recovered.  One of the sites was trashy and several other high-end detectors I had used here had been really challenged requiring a very slow sweep speed and a smaller coil to even hope to find targets.  The Deus with a REACTIVITY setting of “3″ and the 11-inch coil handled these conditions with ease.

Returning home, I was getting ready to put the equipment away when I glanced over at the side yard of my house which dates back to 1915 and wondered if there might be one last keeper yet to find . . . and maybe the 11-inch coil could find it.  I have hunted every inch of the yard – or so I thought – so was not expecting much – but as they say “nothing ventured, nothing gained.”

This boxing medal was located in a well hunted area that had been picked clean. Before retrieval the signal was tested with two other top detectors with 11" coils and neither could locate this item.

This boxing medal was located in a well hunted area that had been picked clean. Before retrieval the signal was tested with two other top detectors with 11″ coils and neither could locate this item.

Less than 5 feet into the yard I got an “82″ that sounded surface yet showed a quarter black . . . and pulled a 1905 Indian Head penny from the ground.  Stunned I continued and got a “90″ with the same black showing and a 1906 Barber dime appeared . . . now I was scratching my head . . . this coil was clearly doing something different based on what was turning up!

But the last signal was the winner . . . 2 feet from a tree I know I have gone past 100 times, I received a clear, repeatable signal that was reading in the low to mid 90′s. Only a sliver of black was showing on the horseshoe. I checked the area with a pair of other detectors – both with 11″ coils – and nothing. The yard has iron throughout it – both small and large – and that may be the factor; however, the Deus hit the target cleanly.

Going into the garage I came out with a spade and pulled out a deep plug – and checking the hole saw that the target was still in the hole. Still sounding good, I began to wonder if it was a large piece of iron that was reading in the upper region in terms of TID values. After all, I had hunted this area countless times and the signal was simply too clear to have been missed before, right? I pulled some more dirt out and checked it with the pinpointer. It was still in the bottom of the hole and as you can see [pictured above], it was down 3 inches past the depth of the ProPointer . . . a good 12″+!

The engraving on the reverse of this boxing medal during this field test shows that this target was a special memento. It will be an interesting item to research and is really what makes this hobby so enjoyable. What a superb find to show off the capabilities of the Deus equipped with the new 11" coil!

The engraving on the reverse of this boxing medal during this field test shows that this target was a special memento. It will be an interesting item to research and is really what makes this hobby so enjoyable. What a superb find to show off the capabilities of the Deus equipped with the new 11″ coil!

I pulled out a medal and, after cleaning it up, saw that it was a boxing medal with the date 9-9-30 engraved on the back and 2nd place stamped into it.  Those are the priceless finds I love to find . . . coins are great but this is truly a one of a kind find . . . a 2nd place medal from September 9, 1930! Now the research begins to see what I can find out about the medal and possibly even the person that received it.

Before wrapping up this report, I loaned the test coil to a fellow Deus user, Terry Stinebeck from southern Michigan.  Without stealing any of his thunder and describing in detail what he found in over 50 hours of focused use with the 11-inch coil, I will close with what he had to say about the coil which was ” Bottom line on the 11″ coil is this is a deeper coil on coin-sized targets, approx. 3/4″ deeper in my bone dry soil (others may find more gains depending on ground conditions).  It is very light for its size, and I was able to swing this coil for 8+ hrs on two separate occasions which is not something I can accomplish with other brands.  It is very durable, and will easily run with the big dogs (or out-gun them).  Once I get my hands on my own 11″, it will be my personal go-to coil and the 9″ will be reserved for the heavy iron!   This coil is the real deal and I believe folks are going to love it.”  Be sure to check out some of the coins and other items that Terry recovered while testing the new coil in his local area on the Real Finds section of the XP Metal Detectors Americas website.

So as additional reports come in on the new coil, I think the consensus will be that XP has “hit another one out of the park” with the 11″ coil design both in terms of weight and performance.

 

Editor’s note:  Andy Sabisch also found a US gold coin while field testing the DEUS 11″ search coil. While the coin is not mentioned in this field test, you can see the gold coin and read the story behind it’s discovery here.

Product Review: XP Detectors WS5 Headphones

By Andy Sabisch

Author Andy Sabisch recently field tested the WS-5 Headphones with the XP DEUS wireless metal detector.

Author Andy Sabisch recently field tested the WS-5 Headphones with the XP DEUS wireless metal detector.

XP Metal Detectors is a relative newcomer to the metal detecting industry; however, since their first detector rolled off the assembly line in 2000, they have continually looked at ways to improve the performance of their products where it counts – in the field.  The company has always worked to build quality into everything that bears their name and the reputation they have earned reflects that philosophy.

XP’s flagship metal detector – the DEUS – has quickly established itself as a premier detector among both novice and experienced treasure hunters in the United States since it was officially introduced here in early 2012 much the way it did throughout Europe, the United Kingdom and Asia when it was released in 2009.  Not simply repackaging existing technology and marketing it as something new, Alain Loubert and his team set out to infuse new technology and designs into their line of metal detectors and the digital platform of the DEUS allowed them to start designing with a “blank slate” so to speak.

The WS5 wireless headphones are designed for use with the XP DEUS metal detector. This full sized, weatherproof headset provides crystal clear audio. Built in jumbo LCD display and touch pad allows for precise control of the metal detector functions.

The WS5 wireless headphones are designed for use with the XP DEUS metal detector. This full sized, weatherproof headset provides crystal clear audio. Built in jumbo LCD display and touch pad allows for precise control of the metal detector functions.

Without going into everything that sets the DEUS apart from other detectors currently available, this product review will focus on one aspect of the DEUS’s design that reflects the fact that many of the XP staff members are active detectorists themselves.  This feature is its wireless design which eliminates all of the cords typically found on metal detectors.  Being able to hunt in the densest of underbrush without having headphone or coil cables getting snagged or not pulling your headphones off because you had inadvertently stepped on the cord when recovering a target is something that one can really get used to in short order.  Unfortunately, with the exception of one manufacturer along with XP, no other manufacturer has opted to put forth the R&D to develop a truly wireless set of headphones that will hold up to the demands treasure hunters place upon their equipment.

The DEUS has had wireless headphones since it was first introduced and they have used what is known as the backphone design.  Rather than the conventional over-the-head design seen on other metal detector headphones, the WS4 backphones fit around the back of one’s head.  They are extremely comfortable and lightweight, especially in warmer weather.  Having used my WS4’s in a wide range of detecting including relic hunting in some areas so overgrown that fellow hunters using corded phones were forced to move to more open areas as well as ocean beaches with waves sweeping into shore, I found them to be effective and more importantly, a pleasure to use.  As the weather started to drop into the 20’s and below however, I did wish that there was an option that would keep my ears warm and while I could always revert back to a set of corded phones, I felt it defeated the advantages of the DEUS’s wireless design.

Well, XP’s team of engineers worked on developing a set of over-the-head phones that would incorporate the controls found on the WS4 backphones as well as be rugged, lighter than similar styles of headphones and have a larger screen to make adjustments easier to see in the field.  The result is the recently unveiled WS5 headphones.

The large LCD display allows the user to control the following: discrimination, sensitivity, ground balance, tones, pitch, frequency, factory programs, volume and coil change.

The large LCD display allows the user to control the following: discrimination, sensitivity, ground balance, tones, pitch, frequency, factory programs, volume and coil change.

When I received the box containing the new WS5 headphones, it showed the customary care and attention to detail that XP has become known for.  The headphones were well-packaged in the typical black box with the XP logo and an insert to ensure they arrive in the same condition in which they left the factory.

The design is such that the ear cups can be folded onto themselves with the entire assembly forming a compact package that can be stowed into a backpack, carry-on bag or even in a larger jacket pocket.  They are easily adjustable and feature multiple ridges on the headband strap that hold the ear cups in the desired position.  The padding used on the cups is very comfortable yet does a nice job of blocking out external noise (as well as cold winds).  Another example that shows that the XP team actually uses what they design is the ability to remove and replace the padded cups on the WS5.  The plate that holds the cups in-place can be popped off and a new set installed in under a minute.  I know I have found myself with a set of headphones on other detectors that after a few months of use in hot Georgia summers were just a tad “gamy” and shredded but there was no way to replace just the padded cups, however, with the WS5, that issue has been addressed.

Pairing the WS5 headphones with the search coil and remote control unit of my DEUS was a snap and the larger display was a notable improvement over the WS4 backphones.  I scrolled through the options by pressing the MENU touchpad and the same functionality provided by the WS4 backphones was provided on the WS5 headphones.  A trick that I have used with the WS4’s that allows you to make adjustments without having to remove them from your head is to listen to the tones when you press the center MENU touchpad.  As each consecutive option scrolls by, the tone will be slightly lower than the preceding option.  You can either tune your ear to listen for a certain tone indicating the function you want to adjust has been selected or count the number of “clicks” from the starting tone.  Once the function has been selected with the MENU touchpad, you can adjust it with the <+> and <-> touchpads.  Remember, this also works with the WS4 backphones so if you have not discovered this trick yet, give it a try next time you head out to the field.

The WS5 features a removeable cover for the USB charging connection.

The WS5 features a removeable cover for the USB charging connection.

I had the opportunity to try the WS5 headphones out at several sites including one that was extremely overgrown and located near a main thoroughfare which made it both a noisy and difficult site to search.  In all cases, the WS5 headphones did a great job in blocking out external noise and the colder temperatures.  The audio response of the speakers in the WS5 closely mimicked that of the WS4 backphones which I had become accustomed to so there was no relearning tones or target responses when switching from one set to the other.  The battery strength indication was still showing more than half-full after more than a dozen hours of use and it took just under an hour on the charger to bring it back to 100%.  Since the WS5 uses a lithium-polymer battery like the other DEUS components, there is no problem recharging them after each hunt or using the car charger to top off all of the components on the way to the hunt site.

People may question the sticker price of the WS5 headphones; however, there are really several groups of DEUS owners and the WS5 was not intended to appeal to all groups equally.  The first group encompasses those that are purchasing their DEUS and have the choice between the WS4 backphones or the WS5 headphones.  If you live in warmer climates and are not routinely hunting in high-noise areas, the WS4 may be the pair you prefer but otherwise the WS5 provides the typical headphone feel in the field.  The other group that the WS5 will appeal to are those that have a DEUS with two or more search coils.  Remember that the brain of the DEUS is in the coil so by picking up a spare shaft assembly, you in essence have two DEUS detectors.  Rather than having to run a set of corded headphones to the control unit’s jack while the other person uses the backphones, buying a set of WS5’s will give you two completely wireless detectors.  The final group includes those that have a DEUS with the WS4 backphones and are satisfied with their

The WS-5 can be folded for safe and easy transport.

The WS-5 can be folded for safe and easy transport.

setup . . . they might not see the need to buy a second set of headphones.  If a member of the final group ever needs to replace their backphones, the WS5 will be an option to consider.  Personally I find that being able to assemble two detectors for little more than the cost of an extra coil and a pair of headphones is pretty amazing and shows just how unique the XP line is in today’s marketplace.

Overall, I was extremely impressed with the build quality of the WS5 headphones.  There have been some concerns voiced over the groves in each cup causing issues from wind noise but that was not the case . . . . they were added to enhance the sound and do not communicate with the outside.  Overall, the WS5 headphones are another first-rate accessory for the DEUS and offer a factory-option to owners not previously available.  Check with your XP dealer for availability and stop by to see how they feel.- I’m pretty certain you will be as impressed with the build quality and audio response as I was.

Western & Eastern Treasures Magazine: Testing the XP DEUS Large Searchcoil by Marc Hirschmann

Author Marc Hirschmann published his XP DEUS large searchcoil field test results in the October 2012 issue of Western & Eastern Treasures Magazine. Over the course of nearly six months, Marc put the XP DEUS large search coil through hundreds of hours of testing at a variety of sites throughout the United States.

Author Marc Hirschmann published the results of his XP DEUS large searchcoil field test in the October 2012 issue of Western & Eastern Treasures.

Author Marc Hirschmann published the results of his XP DEUS large searchcoil field test in the October 2012 issue of Western & Eastern Treasures.

Marc noted that “although the large coil is sold as an optional accessory for the XP DEUS, in my opinion this is a must-have item for every DEUS owner.” He went on to say that “the DEUS, in conjunction with the large coil, is one serious package. Whether you are hunting parks, yards or curb strips, the XP DEUS with the large coil is, in my opinion, the ultimate detector for achieving your goals.”

Testing the XP DEUS Large Search Coil by Marc Hirschmann

Over the past 6 months I have had the pleasure of being given the opportunity to review XP’s 11”x13” coil for the XP DEUS. Before receiving the large coil, I had already owned my DEUS for just over six months and had about 500 hours on the detector. I was very impressed with the standard DEUS package and didn’t expect too much from the large coil.  I assumed it would be too heavy as I truly enjoyed the lightweight nature of the stock package. One of the main reasons I, and many others, originally purchased the DEUS was because most of my other “top of the line” detectors were simply too heavy to swing for days on end.

XP DEUS Large Coil Review and Finds

Author Marc Hirschmann reviews the Large search coil for the XP DEUS wireless metal detector.

From the first time I went out with my XP DEUS, I knew it was a winner. It is extremely lightweight, has the fastest recovery speed of any detector I have ever tested and it is simple to use, edit and learn. After hundreds of hours of testing, I have very few qualms with this machine.

After putting about 500 hours on the detector, the 11”x13” optional search coil showed up at my door and it was time to put it to the test. Over the next six months, I took the coil to Florida, Wisconsin, Idaho and put about 300 hours on it in my home state of Minnesota.

I stated earlier that my expectations were not too high in regards to this accessory, but I was proven very wrong. The weight of the large coil is a marginal increase over the stock coil and after a few hours of use, the variance becomes barely noticeable. The balance of the coil is very good, which surprised me as I have read several accounts online claiming the balance to be “incorrect,” but I completely disagree. The 11”x13” covers so much more ground than the stock 9” coil that I now hunt primarily with the large coil and only switch to the stock coil when I find myself in extremely trashy environments.

My target recovery has increased dramatically since testing the large coil. I find that I am able to cover about two times the ground in the same amount of time as with the stock 9” coil. Being able to cover more ground means more targets recovered. This fact alone justifies the price of the large coil in my opinion. Although the large coil does not currently offer much increased depth over the stock coil, I have found that the audio response of the large coil is clearer, at greater depth than the stock coil. For me, however, the greatest value lies in the greatly increased ground coverage offered by the 11”x13”. I now start my hunts with the large coil about 90% of the time and only switch to the stock 9” if the ground is littered with targets.

If you are a DEUS user, I would strongly recommend you take a closer look at the optional 11”x13” search coil. The stock coil is no slouch, but the optional large coil will help open doors and increase finds. In a world where competition from other metal detector users is ever increasing, you need to make the most out of your time in the field. The 11”x13” coil is a tool that can gain you a greater competitive edge. It has proven its value to me, as well as many other users, and I would therefore urge any serious detectorist to take a closer look at the optional 11”x13” coil.

Western & Eastern Treasures Magazine XP DEUS Field Test by Clive Clynick

Author Clive James Clynick published his XP DEUS field test results in the August 2012 issue of Western & Eastern Treasures Magazine. In his testing Clive puts the XP DEUS wireless metal detector to the test in a variety of sites. He said “black/gray sand is a challenge for any detector. The DEUS delivered impressive depth on low-conductivity targets.”  He went on to say “I especially liked the clean, crisp audio, performance around iron and the number of features oriented to use in tough beach and salt environments.”

Western Eastern Treasures XP DEUS field test report

Author James Clynick field tests the XP DEUS for Western Eastern Treasures magazine.

The Searcher Magazine Tests the Large DEUS Search Coil

In the February 2012 issue of the Searcher, the magazine presents an in depth look at the Large DEUS search coil. This technical review of the coil compares depth and ground coverage over a variety of sites.

The Searcher Magazine field tests the new XP DEUS Large Search Coil.

The Searcher Magazine field tests the new XP DEUS Large Search Coil.

An interesting array of Roman coins were recovered during the testing. Detailed photos and descriptions of the recovered targets are included in the article. The author also shares tips and tricks for getting the most out of the 13 x 11 DD search coil for the XP DEUS.

Treasure Hunting Magazine XP DEUS Field Test Report by John Lynn Part Two

In the May 2010 issue of Treasure Hunting Magazine, John Lynn better known as the Norfolk Wolf, writes a follow up review of the DEUS. In this second article, John shares photos of his finds which include Saxon Sceatta and other Roman coins and jewelry.

Author John Lynn conducts the second part of his XP DEUS field test for Treasure Hunting Magazine.

Author John Lynn conducts the second part of his XP DEUS field test for Treasure Hunting Magazine.

Detailed settings an operating tips an techniques are shared in this article. John Lynn shares a vast amount of information and knowledge of the DEUS with his readers.

Treasure Hunting Magazine XP DEUS Field Test Report by John Lynn Part One

In the April 2010 issue of Treasure Hunting Magazine, John Lynn better known as the Norfolk Wolf, writes a detailed review of the DEUS. This article is the first in a series of two articles by Lynn published in the magazine. During the research and development phase of the DEUS the author field tested several initial prototypes. His active involvement during this phase gives him a unique perspective to share in his report.

Author John Lynn conducts the first part of his XP DEUS field test for Treasure Hunting Magazine.

Author John Lynn conducts the first part of his XP DEUS field test for Treasure Hunting Magazine.

In his report Lynn said “I have never been so excited by any detector as I have with this one. Believe me when I tell you that the more I use it, the more I can appreciate just how superb this creation by XP really is. The DEUS truly is the first all-round detector; the bar hasn’t just been raised again by XP detectors, it has been smashed completely.”