XP DEUS Meteorite Find Classified by Dr. Garvie at Arizona State University

Twink Monrad Meteorite Find

Twink Monrad joined some meteorite hunting friends at the Franconia, Arizona strewn meteorite field where she made this impressive find. Photo courtesy of Don Morin.

meteorite by twin monad

New types of meteorites found in this area are now being given numbers in the Yucca Dense Collection Area.

In December of 2013 Twink Monrad and metal detecting partner Don Morin joined some meteorite hunting friends at the Franconia, Arizona strewn meteorite field. She said “I had been there several times and found the “usual” Franconia stone meteorites plus the tiny metal meteorites which are commonly found in that area.”

A few other different meteorites have been classified in the general area, and any new types are now being given numbers in the Yucca Dense Collection Area.

She went on to say “this meteorite which I found on this particular trip sounded much louder on my XP DEUS (goldfield setting 10) than the usual Franconias and felt much heavier than the

twink monrad meteorite find in Arizona

Dr. Laurence Garvie from Arizona State University recently classified Twink Monrads meteorite find and named it Yucca 031.

 

meteorites classified at ASU

Twink Monrad has found the “usual” Franconia stone meteorites plus the tiny metal meteorites which are commonly found in that area.

regular Franconia stone meteorites. I also noticed that tiny green crystals were visible with a loupe or microscope on a spot where the fusion crust was missing, so I asked Dr. Laurence Garvie from Arizona State University to take a look at it.

He found time to classify it for me and it has been given the name of Yucca 031.

I hope to find many more meteorites with my XP Deus in the future.”

Editors note: Complete details on this find are documented in the Meteoritical Bulletin Database at this link. The Meteoritical Society records all known meteorites in its Meteoritical Bulletin and publishes Meteoritics and Planetary Science, a leading journal of planetary science. Members of the the organization include over 1000 scientists and enthusiasts from 52 countries who study meteorites, cosmic dust, asteroids, comets, samples returned by space missions, impact craters, and the origins of the Solar System. Congratulations to Twink Monrad on this outstanding find and accomplishment!